Children's comprehension and local-to-global recall of narrative and expository texts

Fernando Romero, Scott G. Paris, Sarah K. Brem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined underlying mechanisms for comprehension differences across expository and narrative text while controlling for factors confounded in the extant literature. Fourth grade students (n=32) read both an expository and a narrative text, and completed both a local comprehension assessment, and a global retelling assessment for each text. Children recalled more information from narrative than expository texts in the global processing task, but there was no difference in the local processing task. Our findings are consistent with psycholinguistic studies on the formation of mental models from text, and suggest that narrative structure may facilitate memory for global information even when local comprehension of exposition and narrative is equivalent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalCurrent Issues in Education
Volume8
StatePublished - 2005

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comprehension
narrative
psycholinguistics
school grade
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Children's comprehension and local-to-global recall of narrative and expository texts. / Romero, Fernando; Paris, Scott G.; Brem, Sarah K.

In: Current Issues in Education, Vol. 8, 2005, p. 1-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Romero, Fernando ; Paris, Scott G. ; Brem, Sarah K. / Children's comprehension and local-to-global recall of narrative and expository texts. In: Current Issues in Education. 2005 ; Vol. 8. pp. 1-20.
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