Childhood sexual trauma and subsequent parenting beliefs and behaviors

The Family Life Project Key Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using propensity-matched controls, the present study examines the long-term adjustment of women reporting childhood sexual trauma (CST) at or before the age of 14 in terms of parenting efficacy and parenting behavior. Data for these analyses were obtained from mother reports and from observational protocols from a longitudinal study of low-income, rural families. The novel use of propensity-matched controls to create a control group matched on family of origin variables provides evidence that when women with CST are compared with the matched comparison women, females who experienced CST show poorer functioning across multiple domains of parenting (sensitivity, harsh intrusiveness, boundary dissolution), but not in parenting efficacy. Follow-up moderation analyses suggest that the potential effects of trauma on parenting behaviors are not attenuated by protective factors such as higher income, higher education, or stable adult relationships. Implications for interventions with childhood sexual trauma histories and directions for future study are proposed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-97
Number of pages11
JournalChild Abuse and Neglect
Volume44
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

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Parenting
Wounds and Injuries
Social Adjustment
Longitudinal Studies
Mothers
Education
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Boundary dissolution
  • Childhood sexual trauma
  • Harsh intrusive parenting
  • Propensity matched design
  • Sensitive parenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Childhood sexual trauma and subsequent parenting beliefs and behaviors. / The Family Life Project Key Investigators.

In: Child Abuse and Neglect, Vol. 44, 01.06.2015, p. 87-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

The Family Life Project Key Investigators. / Childhood sexual trauma and subsequent parenting beliefs and behaviors. In: Child Abuse and Neglect. 2015 ; Vol. 44. pp. 87-97.
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