Childhood family environment, social competence, and health across the lifespan

Linda Luecken, Danielle S. Roubinov, Rika Tanaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Childhood family adversity increases the risk of a wide range of psychological and physical health problems later in life, prompting research into developmental pathways linking childhood experiences to adult health. The current paper discusses a social-biological pathway by which childhood family relationships influence the development of the social and emotional skills necessary for adaptive behavioral and biological responses to stress. Failures in the development of social and emotional competence during childhood may lead to dysregulated responses to stress and difficulties in social relationships across the lifespan. Over time, the cumulative impact of dysregulated stress responses and low social support may increase the risk of mental and physical health problems later in life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-178
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

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social competence
life-span
Medical problems
childhood
Health
Family Relations
health
Social Support
Mental Health
Psychology
Research
social support
Social Skills
experience

Keywords

  • Childhood adversity
  • cortisol
  • health
  • social support
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Childhood family environment, social competence, and health across the lifespan. / Luecken, Linda; Roubinov, Danielle S.; Tanaka, Rika.

In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Vol. 30, No. 2, 03.2013, p. 171-178.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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