Child maltreatment and delinquency onset among african american adolescent males

James Williams, Richard A. van Dorn, Charlotte Lyn Bright, Melissa Jonson-Reid, E. von Nebbitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Child welfare and criminology research have increasingly sought to better understand factors that increase the likelihood that abused and neglected children will become involved in the juvenile justice system. However, few studies have addressed this relationship among African American male adolescents. The current study examines the relationship between child maltreatment (i.e., neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse, and other/mixed abuse) and the likelihood of a delinquency petition using a sample of African American males (N = 2,335) born before 1990. Multivariable logistic regression models compared those with a delinquency-based juvenile justice petition to those without. Results indicate that African American males with a history of neglect, physical abuse, or other/mixed abuse were more likely to be involved in the juvenile justice system than those without any child maltreatment. Additionally, multiple maltreatment reports, a prior history of mental health treatment, victimization, and having a parent who did not complete high school also increased the likelihood of a delinquency petition. Implications for intervention and prevention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-259
Number of pages7
JournalResearch on Social Work Practice
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Child Abuse
Social Justice
maltreatment
delinquency
African Americans
petition
abuse
adolescent
justice
Logistic Models
Juvenile Delinquency
Criminology
neglect
Crime Victims
Sex Offenses
Child Welfare
Mental Health
criminology
child welfare
victimization

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • African Americans
  • Child welfare
  • Criminal justice
  • Inferential statistics
  • Poverty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Child maltreatment and delinquency onset among african american adolescent males. / Williams, James; van Dorn, Richard A.; Bright, Charlotte Lyn; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; von Nebbitt, E.

In: Research on Social Work Practice, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.05.2010, p. 253-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williams, James ; van Dorn, Richard A. ; Bright, Charlotte Lyn ; Jonson-Reid, Melissa ; von Nebbitt, E. / Child maltreatment and delinquency onset among african american adolescent males. In: Research on Social Work Practice. 2010 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 253-259.
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