Child, Family, and Community Protective Factors in the Development of Children's Early Conduct Problems

Ella Vanderbilt-Adriance, Daniel S. Shaw, Lauretta M. Brennan, Thomas J. Dishion, Frances Gardner, Melvin N. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study utilized a resilience model to investigate child, family, and community protective factors in toddlerhood as they relate to low levels of conduct problems at age 5 in a sample of low-income children at risk for early disruptive problem behavior. Child, family, and community factors were associated with lower levels of conduct problems at age 5. Child, family, and community protective factors also distinguished between children who remained below versus above a clinical threshold for aggressive problems between age 2 and 5. Finally, each domain of protective factors made small but significant unique contributions to lower aggression at age 5. These results emphasize the importance of multivariate analysis of the ecology of development predicting child outcome and suggest potential areas for intervention with children at high risk for conduct problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-79
Number of pages16
JournalFamily Relations
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Child Development
community
Ecology
Aggression
Protective Factors
multivariate analysis
Multivariate Analysis
aggression
resilience
ecology
low income

Keywords

  • Conduct problems
  • Protective factors
  • Resilience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education

Cite this

Vanderbilt-Adriance, E., Shaw, D. S., Brennan, L. M., Dishion, T. J., Gardner, F., & Wilson, M. N. (2015). Child, Family, and Community Protective Factors in the Development of Children's Early Conduct Problems. Family Relations, 64(1), 64-79. https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12105

Child, Family, and Community Protective Factors in the Development of Children's Early Conduct Problems. / Vanderbilt-Adriance, Ella; Shaw, Daniel S.; Brennan, Lauretta M.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Gardner, Frances; Wilson, Melvin N.

In: Family Relations, Vol. 64, No. 1, 01.02.2015, p. 64-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vanderbilt-Adriance, E, Shaw, DS, Brennan, LM, Dishion, TJ, Gardner, F & Wilson, MN 2015, 'Child, Family, and Community Protective Factors in the Development of Children's Early Conduct Problems', Family Relations, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 64-79. https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12105
Vanderbilt-Adriance E, Shaw DS, Brennan LM, Dishion TJ, Gardner F, Wilson MN. Child, Family, and Community Protective Factors in the Development of Children's Early Conduct Problems. Family Relations. 2015 Feb 1;64(1):64-79. https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12105
Vanderbilt-Adriance, Ella ; Shaw, Daniel S. ; Brennan, Lauretta M. ; Dishion, Thomas J. ; Gardner, Frances ; Wilson, Melvin N. / Child, Family, and Community Protective Factors in the Development of Children's Early Conduct Problems. In: Family Relations. 2015 ; Vol. 64, No. 1. pp. 64-79.
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