Child care arrangements for toddlers and preschoolers: Are they different for youngest children?

Jutta M. Joesch, Erin J. Maher, Alesha Durfee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many extant studies on the use of non-parental child care are based on data from the youngest child in the household. To date, it has not been addressed whether this approach introduces bias. We present reasons why child care arrangements for youngest children may differ from those of same-age older children and examine whether the use of child care, type of arrangement, and use of care in combination with mother's employment differ for youngest versus middle/oldest toddlers and preschoolers with data from the 1999 National Household Education Survey. We find that youngest preschoolers are more likely to attend child care on a regular basis than middle/oldest preschoolers. Further, youngest toddlers and preschoolers are more likely than middle/oldest toddlers and preschoolers to have an employed mother. How families combine the use of child care and maternal employment differs by birth order. Controlling for other child and household characteristics does not explain these differences. Differences in the types of care arrangements used for youngest versus middle/oldest toddlers and preschoolers in non-parental care do not reach statistical significance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-266
Number of pages14
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

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Child Care
child care
Mothers
birth order
Birth Order
statistical significance
Education
present
trend
education

Keywords

  • Birth order
  • Child care
  • Maternal employment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Child care arrangements for toddlers and preschoolers : Are they different for youngest children? / Joesch, Jutta M.; Maher, Erin J.; Durfee, Alesha.

In: Early Childhood Research Quarterly, Vol. 21, No. 3, 2006, p. 253-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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