Chemical trail communication in the amblyoponine species Mystvium rogeri Forel (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Ponerinae)

Bert Hölldobler, Malu Obermayer, Gary D. Alpert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Workers of the amblyoponine species Mystrium rogeri employ trail communication during recruitment to food sources and new nest sites. The trail pheromone originates from a hitherto unknown sternal gland located in the 7th abdominal sternite. The recruiting ant deposits the gland secretions by a special gaster-dragging behavior. The recruitment behavior can be complemented by a rapid vertical body shaking performed by some recruiting ants inside the nest. M. rogeri workers possess a large pygidial gland, the secretion of which elicits a repellent response in other ant species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-123
Number of pages5
JournalChemoecology
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chemical defense
  • Motor display
  • Pygidial glands
  • Recruitment pheromone
  • Sternal glands

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Biochemistry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Chemical trail communication in the amblyoponine species Mystvium rogeri Forel (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Ponerinae)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this