Charting the relationship trajectories of aggressive, withdrawn, and aggressive/withdrawn children during early grade school

Gary Ladd, Kim B. Burgess

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

282 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The premises examined in this longitudinal investigation were that specific behavioral characteristics place children at risk for relationship maladjustment in school environments, and that multiple behavioral risks pre-dispose children to the most severe and prolonged difficulties. Aggressive, withdrawn, and aggressive/withdrawn children were compared to normative and matched control groups on teacher and peer relationship attributes, loneliness, and social satisfaction from kindergarten (M age = 5 years, 7 months; n = 250) through grade 2 (M age = 8,1; n = 242). Children's withdrawn behavior was neither highly stable nor predictive of relational difficulties, as their trajectories resembled the norm except for initially less close and more dependent relationships with teachers. Aggressive behavior was fairly stable, and associated with early-emerging, sustained difficulties including low peer acceptance and conflictual teacher-child relationships. Aggressive/withdrawn children evidenced the most difficulty: compared to children in the normative group, they were consistently more lonely, dissatisfied, friendless, disliked, victimized, and likely to have maladaptive teacher-child relationships. Findings are discussed with respect to recent developments in two prominent literatures: children at-risk and early relationship development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)910-929
Number of pages20
JournalChild Development
Volume70
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

school grade
teacher
Loneliness
children's literature
aggressive behavior
Child Behavior
kindergarten
Research Design
Group
acceptance
Control Groups
school

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Charting the relationship trajectories of aggressive, withdrawn, and aggressive/withdrawn children during early grade school. / Ladd, Gary; Burgess, Kim B.

In: Child Development, Vol. 70, No. 4, 07.1999, p. 910-929.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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