Characterization of the hollow fiber assay for the determination of microtubule disruption in vivo

Marie Suggitt, David J. Swaine, George Pettit, Michael C. Bibby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The hollow fiber assay is used successfully as a routine in vivo screening model to quantitatively define anticancer activity by the National Cancer Institute. This study investigates whether the hollow fiber assay can be used as a short-term in vivo model to demonstrate specific pharmacodynamic end points, namely microtubule and cell cycle disruption. Experimental Design: The growth of A549 cells was characterized within hollow fibers over 5 days in vivo at both subcutaneous (s.c.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) sites. Drugs were administered on day 4 (i.p.). Results: At 24 hours, cells were retrieved from fibers at both i.p. and s.c. sites of paclitaxel-treated (20 mg/kg) and combretastatin A1 phosphate-treated (150 mg/kg) mice. Cell cycle analysis after paclitaxel treatment revealed a mean G2-M phase population of 48.04% (i.p.) and 25.76% (s.c.) compared with vehicle group mice (6.78 and 5.56%, respectively; P = <0.001 and 0.005, respectively). Tumor cells retrieved from combretastatin A1 phosphate-treated mice had a mean G2-M phase population of 36.3% (i.p.) and 29.36% (s.c.) compared with cells retrieved from vehicle group mice (5.58 and 5.49%, respectively; P = < 0.001). Using fluorescence and laser-confocal microscopy, paclitaxel was revealed to induce the formation of spindle asters and tubulin polymerization. Combretastatin A1 phosphate was shown to hold cells in mitosis. Changes in nuclear morphology were also observed. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that the hollow fiber assay can be used as a short-term in vivo model for studying the pharmacodynamic effects of both standard and novel compounds on microtubules. Evidence has also been provided to support the routine use of the in vivo hollow fiber assay for demonstrating the mechanism of action of a drug.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6677-6685
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume10
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2004

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Microtubules
Paclitaxel
G2 Phase
Phosphates
Confocal Microscopy
Cell Division
Cell Cycle
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Tubulin
Mitosis
Polymerization
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population
Research Design
Fluorescence
Growth
combretastatin A-1
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Characterization of the hollow fiber assay for the determination of microtubule disruption in vivo. / Suggitt, Marie; Swaine, David J.; Pettit, George; Bibby, Michael C.

In: Clinical Cancer Research, Vol. 10, No. 19, 01.10.2004, p. 6677-6685.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suggitt, Marie ; Swaine, David J. ; Pettit, George ; Bibby, Michael C. / Characterization of the hollow fiber assay for the determination of microtubule disruption in vivo. In: Clinical Cancer Research. 2004 ; Vol. 10, No. 19. pp. 6677-6685.
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