Characterization of Exercise and Alcohol Self-Management Behaviors of Type 1 Diabetes Patients on Insulin Pump Therapy

Maria Grando, Danielle Groat, Hiral Soni, Mary Boyle, Marilyn Bailey, Bithika Thompson, Curtiss B. Cook

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: There is a lack of systematic ways to analyze how diabetes patients use their insulin pumps to self-manage blood glucose to compensate for alcohol ingestion and exercise. The objective was to analyze "real-life" insulin dosing decisions occurring in conjunction with alcohol intake and exercise among patients using insulin pumps. Methods: We recruited adult type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients on insulin pump therapy. Participants were asked to maintain their daily routines, including those related to exercising and consuming alcohol, and keep a 30-day journal on exercise performed and alcohol consumed. Thirty days of insulin pump data were downloaded. Participants' actual insulin dosing behaviors were compared against their self-reported behaviors in the setting of exercise and alcohol. Results: Nineteen T1D patients were recruited and over 4000 interactions with the insulin pump were analyzed. The analysis exposed variability in how subjects perceived the effects of exercise/alcohol on their blood glucose, inconsistencies between self-reported and observed behaviors, and higher rates of blood glucose control behaviors for exercise versus alcohol. Conclusion: Compensation techniques and perceptions on how exercise and alcohol affect their blood glucose levels vary between patients. Improved individualized educational techniques that take into consideration a patient's unique life style are needed to help patients effectively apply alcohol and exercise compensation techniques.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)240-246
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of diabetes science and technology
    Volume11
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

    Fingerprint

    Insulin
    Self Care
    Medical problems
    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
    Alcohols
    Pumps
    Exercise
    Glucose
    Blood Glucose
    Blood
    Therapeutics
    Behavior Control
    Life Style
    Teaching
    Eating

    Keywords

    • alcohol
    • carbohydrates
    • diabetes
    • exercise
    • insulin dosing
    • insulin pump
    • self-management behaviors
    • type 1 diabetes

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Internal Medicine
    • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
    • Bioengineering
    • Medicine(all)
    • Biomedical Engineering

    Cite this

    Characterization of Exercise and Alcohol Self-Management Behaviors of Type 1 Diabetes Patients on Insulin Pump Therapy. / Grando, Maria; Groat, Danielle; Soni, Hiral; Boyle, Mary; Bailey, Marilyn; Thompson, Bithika; Cook, Curtiss B.

    In: Journal of diabetes science and technology, Vol. 11, No. 2, 01.03.2017, p. 240-246.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Grando, Maria ; Groat, Danielle ; Soni, Hiral ; Boyle, Mary ; Bailey, Marilyn ; Thompson, Bithika ; Cook, Curtiss B. / Characterization of Exercise and Alcohol Self-Management Behaviors of Type 1 Diabetes Patients on Insulin Pump Therapy. In: Journal of diabetes science and technology. 2017 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 240-246.
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