Characterization and source attribution of atmospheric fine particulate organic matter

Yuling Jia, Shagun Bhat, Matthew Fraser

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The chemical speciation and source attribution analysis of fine particulate samples (PM2.5) collected at San Augustine, TX, and Dallas, TX, are presented. The total ratio of measured saccharides to organic carbon (OC) in PM2.5 was higher at San Augustine than Dallas, suggesting that biologically related sources, which are enriched in these compounds are a greater contributor to the fine aerosol OC loading in the rural location. Mean concentrations of n-alkanes ranged from 0.01 to 38.1 ng/cu m for San Augustine and 0.16 to 30.7 ng/cu m for Dallas. n-Alkanes measured in ambient PM2.5 samples collected in San Augustine exhibited odd carbon number of predominance, as expected for a predominantly rural site with little input from petroleum-derived fuels. However, for samples collected at Dallas, little or no odd carbon number predominance was observed, which was characteristic of the strong influence of emissions derived from fossil carbon sources. EPA's Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model was used for modeling both urban both urban and rural ambient concentrations. Ambient market concentrations for 25 and 37 sampling days for Dallas and San Augustine, respectively, were used in this analysis. Similar profiles were resolved using PMF for both the datasets. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 103rd AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition (Calgary, Alberta, Canada 6/22-25/2010).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA
Pages6227-6241
Number of pages15
Volume8
StatePublished - 2010
Event103rd Air and Waste Management Association Annual Conference and Exhibition 2010 - Calgary, AB, Canada
Duration: Jun 22 2010Jun 25 2010

Other

Other103rd Air and Waste Management Association Annual Conference and Exhibition 2010
CountryCanada
CityCalgary, AB
Period6/22/106/25/10

Fingerprint

particulate organic matter
Biological materials
Organic carbon
Factorization
alkane
Paraffins
Carbon
carbon
organic carbon
Chemical speciation
matrix
speciation (chemistry)
Aerosols
Crude oil
petroleum
fossil
aerosol
Sampling
market
sampling

Keywords

  • Fine PM
  • PM2.5
  • Saccharides
  • Source apportionment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Energy(all)

Cite this

Jia, Y., Bhat, S., & Fraser, M. (2010). Characterization and source attribution of atmospheric fine particulate organic matter. In Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA (Vol. 8, pp. 6227-6241)

Characterization and source attribution of atmospheric fine particulate organic matter. / Jia, Yuling; Bhat, Shagun; Fraser, Matthew.

Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA. Vol. 8 2010. p. 6227-6241.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Jia, Y, Bhat, S & Fraser, M 2010, Characterization and source attribution of atmospheric fine particulate organic matter. in Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA. vol. 8, pp. 6227-6241, 103rd Air and Waste Management Association Annual Conference and Exhibition 2010, Calgary, AB, Canada, 6/22/10.
Jia Y, Bhat S, Fraser M. Characterization and source attribution of atmospheric fine particulate organic matter. In Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA. Vol. 8. 2010. p. 6227-6241
Jia, Yuling ; Bhat, Shagun ; Fraser, Matthew. / Characterization and source attribution of atmospheric fine particulate organic matter. Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA. Vol. 8 2010. pp. 6227-6241
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