Characterization and Coding of Behaviorally Significant Odor Mixtures

Jeffrey A. Riffell, Hong Lei, Thomas A. Christensen, John G. Hildebrand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

131 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For animals to execute odor-driven behaviors, the olfactory system must process complex odor signals and maintain stimulus identity in the face of constantly changing odor intensities [1-5]. Surprisingly, how the olfactory system maintains identity of complex odors is unclear [6-10]. We took advantage of the plant-pollinator relationship between the Sacred Datura (Datura wrightii) and the moth Manduca sexta [11, 12] to determine how olfactory networks in this insect's brain represent odor mixtures. We combined gas chromatography and neural-ensemble recording in the moth's antennal lobe to examine population codes for the floral mixture and its fractionated components. Although the floral scent of D. wrightii comprises at least 60 compounds, only nine of those elicited robust neural responses. Behavioral experiments confirmed that these nine odorants mediate flower-foraging behaviors, but only as a mixture. Moreover, the mixture evoked equivalent foraging behaviors over a 1000-fold range in dilution, suggesting a singular percept across this concentration range. Furthermore, neural-ensemble recordings in the moth's antennal lobe revealed that reliable encoding of the floral mixture is organized through synchronized activity distributed across a population of glomerular coding units, and this timing mechanism may bind the features of a complex stimulus into a coherent odor percept.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-340
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 24 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Odors
odors
Moths
Datura wrightii
Datura
antennal lobe
moths
foraging
Manduca
Gas chromatography
Manduca sexta
Dilution
pollinating insects
Odorants
Brain
odor compounds
Gas Chromatography
Animals
Population
Insects

Keywords

  • SYSNEURO

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Characterization and Coding of Behaviorally Significant Odor Mixtures. / Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Lei, Hong; Christensen, Thomas A.; Hildebrand, John G.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 19, No. 4, 24.02.2009, p. 335-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Riffell, Jeffrey A. ; Lei, Hong ; Christensen, Thomas A. ; Hildebrand, John G. / Characterization and Coding of Behaviorally Significant Odor Mixtures. In: Current Biology. 2009 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 335-340.
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