Changing nutrition standards in schools: The emerging impact on school revenue

Christopher Wharton, Michael Long, Marlene B. Schwartz

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    52 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background Although great focus has been placed on nutritional and other consequences of changes in food-related policies within schools, few reports exist describing the impact of such changes on school revenue. This review provides an overview of the few revenue-related studies published recently, as well as information from a sampling of state reports on the subject. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted. Four peer-reviewed papers and 3 state-based reports were identified that assessed the impact on revenues of either targeted policy changes or overarching, district-wide changes in food-related policies. Results Thus far, few data exist to substantiate the concern that changes in nutrition standards in schools lead to a loss in total revenue. An interesting phenomenon of increased participation in the National School Lunch Program was noted in a number of reports and might play a role in buffering financial losses. Conclusions A renewed focus on school policies related to health provides the opportunity for researchers to investigate how nutrition-related policy change can affect, if at all, food service and overall school revenues.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)245-251
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of School Health
    Volume78
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - May 2008

    Fingerprint

    nutrition
    revenue
    Nutrition Policy
    school
    food
    school policy
    Food Services
    Lunch
    Nutrition
    Revenue
    district
    Research Personnel
    participation
    health
    Health
    Food

    Keywords

    • Child and adolescent health
    • Health policy
    • Nutrition and diet
    • School funding

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Nursing(all)
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Education

    Cite this

    Changing nutrition standards in schools : The emerging impact on school revenue. / Wharton, Christopher; Long, Michael; Schwartz, Marlene B.

    In: Journal of School Health, Vol. 78, No. 5, 05.2008, p. 245-251.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Wharton, Christopher ; Long, Michael ; Schwartz, Marlene B. / Changing nutrition standards in schools : The emerging impact on school revenue. In: Journal of School Health. 2008 ; Vol. 78, No. 5. pp. 245-251.
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