Changing Federal Government Employee Attitudes Since the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978

Haksoo Lee, N. Joseph Cayer, G. Zhiyong Lan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines federal employee attitudes since the passage of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978. By reviewing seven employee surveys conducted by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management since 1979, we examine how attitudes have changed. We then analyze the degree to which organizational effectiveness, job satisfaction, and support for organizational change are affected by customer orientation, supervisory leadership, empowerment, teamwork, training and development, performance management, diversity, family-friendly policies, and labor relations. This study finds that (a) employee attitudes on most dimensions have been mildly positive; (b) employee attitudes somewhat reflect reform policies of each administration, presidential leadership, and environmental change; and (c) perceptions of organizational effectiveness, job satisfaction, and support for organizational change have been affected predominantly by customer orientation, supervisory leadership, empowerment, teamwork, performance evaluation fairness, and performance rewards. Finally, the study suggests that civil service reform integrate long-lasting strategies based on improved responsiveness and competitiveness of federal employees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-51
Number of pages31
JournalReview of Public Personnel Administration
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • employee surveys
  • federal employee attitudes
  • reform

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Administration
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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