Changes in estrogen/anti-estrogen activities in ponded secondary effluent

Otakuye Conroy-Ben, A. Eduardo Sáez, David Quanrud, Wendell Ela, Robert G. Arnold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Total estrogenic activity, measured using the yeast estrogen screen reporter gene bioassay, decreased from 60 pM (equivalent 17α-ethinylestradiol concentration) to an estimated 1.4 pM during a 24-hour period in which secondary effluent was held in a shallow infiltration basin. Over the same period, anti-estrogenic activity, measured as an equivalent concentration of tamoxifen, increased from 35 to 260 nM, suggesting that antagonists produced during secondary effluent storage played a role in the apparent loss of estrogenic activity. Androgenic activity, measured over the same 24-hour period using the yeast androgen screen, was near or below the method detection limit (0.7 pM as testosterone). However, the same pond samples were clearly anti-androgenic. When whole-sample extracts were separated via adsorption and stepwise elution in alcohol/water solutions consisting of 20, 40 and 100% ethanol, the sum of estrogenic activities in derived fractions was always lower than the measured estrogenic activity in the whole-sample extracts. Summed anti-estrogenic activities in the same fractions, however, always exceeded values for corresponding whole-sample extracts. Results reinforce the importance of sample preparation steps (concentration of organics followed by estrogen/anti-estrogen separation) when measuring endocrine-related activities in chemically complex samples such as wastewater effluent. The potential complexity of relationships among estrogens, anti-estrogens and matrix organics suggests that additive models are of questionable validity for estimating whole-sample estrogenic activity from measurements involving sample fractions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-323
Number of pages13
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume382
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

Fingerprint

Effluents
Estrogens
effluent
yeast
androgen
Yeast
testosterone
sample preparation
detection method
bioassay
alcohol
ethanol
infiltration
pond
Ethinyl Estradiol
Bioassay
adsorption
Ponds
wastewater
Tamoxifen

Keywords

  • Androgens
  • Anti-androgens
  • Anti-estrogens
  • Estrogens
  • Wastewater treatment
  • Yeast estrogen screen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Changes in estrogen/anti-estrogen activities in ponded secondary effluent. / Conroy-Ben, Otakuye; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Quanrud, David; Ela, Wendell; Arnold, Robert G.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 382, No. 2-3, 01.09.2007, p. 311-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Conroy-Ben, Otakuye ; Sáez, A. Eduardo ; Quanrud, David ; Ela, Wendell ; Arnold, Robert G. / Changes in estrogen/anti-estrogen activities in ponded secondary effluent. In: Science of the Total Environment. 2007 ; Vol. 382, No. 2-3. pp. 311-323.
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