Abstract

Background Neurosurgery simulator development is growing as practitioners recognize the need for improved instructional and rehearsal platforms to improve procedural skills and patient care. In addition, changes in practice patterns have decreased the volume of specific cases, such as aneurysm clippings, which reduces the opportunity for operating room experience. Objective The authors developed a hands-on, dimensionally accurate model for aneurysm clipping using patient-derived anatomic data and three-dimensional (3D) printing. Design of the model focused on reproducibility as well as adaptability to new patient geometry. Methods A modular, reproducible, and patient-derived medical simulacrum was developed for medical learners to practice aneurysmal clipping procedures. Various forms of 3D printing were used to develop a geometrically accurate cranium and vascular tree featuring 9 patient-derived aneurysms. 3D printing in conjunction with elastomeric casting was leveraged to achieve a patient-derived brain model with tactile properties not yet available from commercial 3D printing technology. An educational pilot study was performed to gauge simulation efficacy. Results Through the novel manufacturing process, a patient-derived simulacrum was developed for neurovascular surgical simulation. A follow-up qualitative study suggests potential to enhance current educational programs; assessments support the efficacy of the simulacrum. Conclusions The proposed aneurysm clipping simulator has the potential to improve learning experiences in surgical environment. 3D printing and elastomeric casting can produce patient-derived models for a dynamic learning environment that add value to surgical training and preparation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-181
Number of pages7
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume88
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Fingerprint

Patient Simulation
Intracranial Aneurysm
Silicones
Aneurysm
Learning
Touch
Neurosurgery
Operating Rooms
Three Dimensional Printing
Skull
Blood Vessels
Patient Care
Technology
Brain

Keywords

  • Anatomical modeling
  • Aneurysms
  • Key words 3D printing
  • Surgical simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Surgery Simulation Using Patient-Specific 3D Printing and Silicone Casting. / Ryan, Justin R.; Almefty, Kaith K.; Nakaji, Peter; Frakes, David.

In: World Neurosurgery, Vol. 88, 01.04.2016, p. 175-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ryan, Justin R. ; Almefty, Kaith K. ; Nakaji, Peter ; Frakes, David. / Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Surgery Simulation Using Patient-Specific 3D Printing and Silicone Casting. In: World Neurosurgery. 2016 ; Vol. 88. pp. 175-181.
@article{19bbcfda06e740fe99e663d7615061d9,
title = "Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Surgery Simulation Using Patient-Specific 3D Printing and Silicone Casting",
abstract = "Background Neurosurgery simulator development is growing as practitioners recognize the need for improved instructional and rehearsal platforms to improve procedural skills and patient care. In addition, changes in practice patterns have decreased the volume of specific cases, such as aneurysm clippings, which reduces the opportunity for operating room experience. Objective The authors developed a hands-on, dimensionally accurate model for aneurysm clipping using patient-derived anatomic data and three-dimensional (3D) printing. Design of the model focused on reproducibility as well as adaptability to new patient geometry. Methods A modular, reproducible, and patient-derived medical simulacrum was developed for medical learners to practice aneurysmal clipping procedures. Various forms of 3D printing were used to develop a geometrically accurate cranium and vascular tree featuring 9 patient-derived aneurysms. 3D printing in conjunction with elastomeric casting was leveraged to achieve a patient-derived brain model with tactile properties not yet available from commercial 3D printing technology. An educational pilot study was performed to gauge simulation efficacy. Results Through the novel manufacturing process, a patient-derived simulacrum was developed for neurovascular surgical simulation. A follow-up qualitative study suggests potential to enhance current educational programs; assessments support the efficacy of the simulacrum. Conclusions The proposed aneurysm clipping simulator has the potential to improve learning experiences in surgical environment. 3D printing and elastomeric casting can produce patient-derived models for a dynamic learning environment that add value to surgical training and preparation.",
keywords = "Anatomical modeling, Aneurysms, Key words 3D printing, Surgical simulation",
author = "Ryan, {Justin R.} and Almefty, {Kaith K.} and Peter Nakaji and David Frakes",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.wneu.2015.12.102",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "88",
pages = "175--181",
journal = "World Neurosurgery",
issn = "1878-8750",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Surgery Simulation Using Patient-Specific 3D Printing and Silicone Casting

AU - Ryan, Justin R.

AU - Almefty, Kaith K.

AU - Nakaji, Peter

AU - Frakes, David

PY - 2016/4/1

Y1 - 2016/4/1

N2 - Background Neurosurgery simulator development is growing as practitioners recognize the need for improved instructional and rehearsal platforms to improve procedural skills and patient care. In addition, changes in practice patterns have decreased the volume of specific cases, such as aneurysm clippings, which reduces the opportunity for operating room experience. Objective The authors developed a hands-on, dimensionally accurate model for aneurysm clipping using patient-derived anatomic data and three-dimensional (3D) printing. Design of the model focused on reproducibility as well as adaptability to new patient geometry. Methods A modular, reproducible, and patient-derived medical simulacrum was developed for medical learners to practice aneurysmal clipping procedures. Various forms of 3D printing were used to develop a geometrically accurate cranium and vascular tree featuring 9 patient-derived aneurysms. 3D printing in conjunction with elastomeric casting was leveraged to achieve a patient-derived brain model with tactile properties not yet available from commercial 3D printing technology. An educational pilot study was performed to gauge simulation efficacy. Results Through the novel manufacturing process, a patient-derived simulacrum was developed for neurovascular surgical simulation. A follow-up qualitative study suggests potential to enhance current educational programs; assessments support the efficacy of the simulacrum. Conclusions The proposed aneurysm clipping simulator has the potential to improve learning experiences in surgical environment. 3D printing and elastomeric casting can produce patient-derived models for a dynamic learning environment that add value to surgical training and preparation.

AB - Background Neurosurgery simulator development is growing as practitioners recognize the need for improved instructional and rehearsal platforms to improve procedural skills and patient care. In addition, changes in practice patterns have decreased the volume of specific cases, such as aneurysm clippings, which reduces the opportunity for operating room experience. Objective The authors developed a hands-on, dimensionally accurate model for aneurysm clipping using patient-derived anatomic data and three-dimensional (3D) printing. Design of the model focused on reproducibility as well as adaptability to new patient geometry. Methods A modular, reproducible, and patient-derived medical simulacrum was developed for medical learners to practice aneurysmal clipping procedures. Various forms of 3D printing were used to develop a geometrically accurate cranium and vascular tree featuring 9 patient-derived aneurysms. 3D printing in conjunction with elastomeric casting was leveraged to achieve a patient-derived brain model with tactile properties not yet available from commercial 3D printing technology. An educational pilot study was performed to gauge simulation efficacy. Results Through the novel manufacturing process, a patient-derived simulacrum was developed for neurovascular surgical simulation. A follow-up qualitative study suggests potential to enhance current educational programs; assessments support the efficacy of the simulacrum. Conclusions The proposed aneurysm clipping simulator has the potential to improve learning experiences in surgical environment. 3D printing and elastomeric casting can produce patient-derived models for a dynamic learning environment that add value to surgical training and preparation.

KW - Anatomical modeling

KW - Aneurysms

KW - Key words 3D printing

KW - Surgical simulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959137667&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84959137667&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.wneu.2015.12.102

DO - 10.1016/j.wneu.2015.12.102

M3 - Article

VL - 88

SP - 175

EP - 181

JO - World Neurosurgery

JF - World Neurosurgery

SN - 1878-8750

ER -