Abstract

A recent theoretical model of centrality (Bernstein, 1987; Bernstein, Hofmann, Santiago, & Diebolt, 1989) suggests that the importance attached to certain "central issues" may increase the vulnerability of individuals to distress and depression, and may explain the differential rates of depression among gender, racial, and ethnic groups. The present study was designed to examine the importance of central issues as reported by Anglo, Black, and Hispanic men and women (N=169). Multivariate analyses revealed significant gender, ethnicity, and gender X ethnicity effects. Specifically, women considered Intimacy significantly more important than did men, whereas men attached more importance than women to Affiliation. Anglos rated Achievement significantly higher than did Hispanics and Blacks; Hispanics considered Affiliation more important than the other two groups; and Blacks considered Intimacy the least important among the groups. Moreover, Hispanic men attributed significantly greater importance to Change, Adventure, and Control, whereas Hispanic women attached the least significance among all the groups to Control. The results are discussed in terms of cultural influences on sex role orientation and central issues, and the process by which culture and ethnicity may be related to vulnerability to depression and distress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-252
Number of pages12
JournalCurrent Psychology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1991

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Hispanic Americans
Depression
Ethnic Groups
Sexual Behavior
Theoretical Models
Multivariate Analysis
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Central issue importance as a function of gender and ethnicity. / Bernstein, Bianca.

In: Current Psychology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 12.1991, p. 241-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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