Celiac vagotomy reduces suppression of feeding by jejunal fatty acid infusions

James E. Cox, William Tyler, Alan Randich, Gary R. Kelm, Stephen T. Meller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the role of the celiac branch of the vagus nerve in suppression of food intake produced by jejunal fatty acids infusions. Following selective celiac vagotomy or sham surgery, adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats received 7 h infusions of linoleic acid or saline through indwelling jejunal catheters on four consecutive days. Although linoleic acid still produced significant suppression of intake in rats with celiac vagotomy, it was less effective in these animals than in controls. The temporal pattern of results suggested that celiac afferent fibers are involved in mediating both pre- and postabsorptive effects of infused fatty acids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1093-1096
Number of pages4
JournalNeuroReport
Volume12
Issue number6
StatePublished - May 8 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vagotomy
Abdomen
Fatty Acids
Linoleic Acid
Indwelling Catheters
Vagus Nerve
Sprague Dawley Rats
Eating

Keywords

  • Linoleic acid
  • Rats
  • Satiety
  • Small intestine
  • Vagal afferents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Cox, J. E., Tyler, W., Randich, A., Kelm, G. R., & Meller, S. T. (2001). Celiac vagotomy reduces suppression of feeding by jejunal fatty acid infusions. NeuroReport, 12(6), 1093-1096.

Celiac vagotomy reduces suppression of feeding by jejunal fatty acid infusions. / Cox, James E.; Tyler, William; Randich, Alan; Kelm, Gary R.; Meller, Stephen T.

In: NeuroReport, Vol. 12, No. 6, 08.05.2001, p. 1093-1096.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cox, JE, Tyler, W, Randich, A, Kelm, GR & Meller, ST 2001, 'Celiac vagotomy reduces suppression of feeding by jejunal fatty acid infusions', NeuroReport, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 1093-1096.
Cox JE, Tyler W, Randich A, Kelm GR, Meller ST. Celiac vagotomy reduces suppression of feeding by jejunal fatty acid infusions. NeuroReport. 2001 May 8;12(6):1093-1096.
Cox, James E. ; Tyler, William ; Randich, Alan ; Kelm, Gary R. ; Meller, Stephen T. / Celiac vagotomy reduces suppression of feeding by jejunal fatty acid infusions. In: NeuroReport. 2001 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 1093-1096.
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