Causal Evidence for the Dependence of the Magnitude Effect on Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

Ian C. Ballard, Gökhan Aydogan, Bokyung Kim, Samuel McClure

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Impulsivity refers to the tendency to insufficiently consider alternatives or to overvalue rewards that are available immediately. Impulsivity is a hallmark of human decision making with well documented health and financial ramifications. Numerous contextual changes and framing manipulations powerfully influence impulsivity. One of the most robust such phenomenon is the finding that people are more patient as the values of choice options are increased. This magnitude effect has been related to cognitive control mechanisms in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to transiently disrupt dlPFC neural activity. This manipulation dramatically reduced the magnitude effect, establishing causal evidence that the magnitude effect depends on dlPFC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number16545
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Impulsive Behavior
Prefrontal Cortex
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Reward
Decision Making
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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Causal Evidence for the Dependence of the Magnitude Effect on Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex. / Ballard, Ian C.; Aydogan, Gökhan; Kim, Bokyung; McClure, Samuel.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 8, No. 1, 16545, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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