Carbon geography: The political economy of congressional support for legislation intended to mitigate greenhouse gas production

Michael I. Cragg, Yuyu Zhou, Kevin Gurney, Matthew E. Kahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Over the last 5 years, the U.S. Congress has voted on several pieces of legislation intended to sharply reduce the nation's greenhouse gas emissions. Given that climate change is a world public bad, standard economic logic would predict that the United States would "free ride" and wait for other nations to reduce their emissions. Within the Congress, there are clear patterns to who votes in favor of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. This paper presents a political economy analysis of the determinants of "pro-green" votes on such legislation. Conservatives consistently vote against such legislation. Controlling for a representative's ideology, representatives from richer districts and districts with a lower per-capita carbon dioxide footprint are more likely to vote in favor of climate change mitigation legislation. Representatives from districts where industrial emissions represent a larger share of greenhouse gas emissions are more likely to vote no. (JEL Q54, Q58, R50)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1640-1650
Number of pages11
JournalEconomic Inquiry
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Carbon geography: The political economy of congressional support for legislation intended to mitigate greenhouse gas production'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this