Carbon dating cancer: Defining the chronology of metastatic progression in colorectal cancer

H. Lote, I. Spiteri, L. Ermini, A. Vatsiou, A. Roy, A. McDonald, N. Maka, M. Balsitis, N. Bose, M. Simbolo, A. Mafficini, A. Lampis, J. C. Hahne, F. Trevisani, Z. Eltahir, G. Mentrasti, C. Findlay, E. A.J. Kalkman, M. Punta, B. WernerS. Lise, C Athena Aktipis, Carlo Maley, M. Greaves, C. Braconi, J. White, M. Fassan, A. Scarpa, A. Sottoriva, N. Valeri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Patients often ask oncologists how long a cancer has been present before causing symptoms or spreading to other organs. The evolutionary trajectory of cancers can be defined using phylogenetic approaches but lack of chronological references makes dating the exact onset of tumours very challenging. Patients and methods: Here, we describe the case of a colorectal cancer (CRC) patient presenting with synchronous lung metastasis and metachronous thyroid, chest wall and urinary tract metastases over the course of 5 years. The chest wall metastasis was caused by needle tract seeding, implying a known time of onset. Using whole genome sequencing data from primary and metastatic sites we inferred the complete chronology of the cancer by exploiting the time of needle tract seeding as an in vivo 'stopwatch'. This approach allowed us to follow the progression of the disease back in time, dating each ancestral node of the phylogenetic tree in the past history of the tumour. We used a Bayesian phylogenomic approach, which accounts for possible dynamic changes in mutational rate, to reconstruct the phylogenetic tree and effectively 'carbon date' the malignant progression. Results: The primary colon cancer emerged between 5 and 8 years before the clinical diagnosis. The primary tumour metastasized to the lung and the thyroid within a year from its onset. The thyroid lesion presented as a tumour-to-tumour deposit within a benign Hurthle adenoma. Despite rapid metastatic progression from the primary tumour, the patient showed an indolent disease course. Primary cancer and metastases were microsatellite stable and displayed low chromosomal instability. Neo-antigen analysis suggested minimal immunogenicity. Conclusion: Our data provide the first in vivo experimental evidence documenting the timing of metastatic progression in CRC and suggest that genomic instability might be more important than themetastatic potential of the primary cancer in dictating CRC fate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbermdx074
Pages (from-to)1243-1249
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Oncology
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Radiometric Dating
Chronology
Colorectal Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Thyroid Gland
Thoracic Wall
Needles
Lung
Chromosomal Instability
Bayes Theorem
Genomic Instability
Urinary Tract
Adenoma
Microsatellite Repeats

Keywords

  • Cancer evolution
  • Metastatic colorectal carcinoma
  • Mutational analysis
  • Phylogenetic tree
  • Synchronous metastases
  • Whole genome sequencing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Lote, H., Spiteri, I., Ermini, L., Vatsiou, A., Roy, A., McDonald, A., ... Valeri, N. (2017). Carbon dating cancer: Defining the chronology of metastatic progression in colorectal cancer. Annals of Oncology, 28(6), 1243-1249. [mdx074]. https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdx074

Carbon dating cancer : Defining the chronology of metastatic progression in colorectal cancer. / Lote, H.; Spiteri, I.; Ermini, L.; Vatsiou, A.; Roy, A.; McDonald, A.; Maka, N.; Balsitis, M.; Bose, N.; Simbolo, M.; Mafficini, A.; Lampis, A.; Hahne, J. C.; Trevisani, F.; Eltahir, Z.; Mentrasti, G.; Findlay, C.; Kalkman, E. A.J.; Punta, M.; Werner, B.; Lise, S.; Aktipis, C Athena; Maley, Carlo; Greaves, M.; Braconi, C.; White, J.; Fassan, M.; Scarpa, A.; Sottoriva, A.; Valeri, N.

In: Annals of Oncology, Vol. 28, No. 6, mdx074, 01.06.2017, p. 1243-1249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lote, H, Spiteri, I, Ermini, L, Vatsiou, A, Roy, A, McDonald, A, Maka, N, Balsitis, M, Bose, N, Simbolo, M, Mafficini, A, Lampis, A, Hahne, JC, Trevisani, F, Eltahir, Z, Mentrasti, G, Findlay, C, Kalkman, EAJ, Punta, M, Werner, B, Lise, S, Aktipis, CA, Maley, C, Greaves, M, Braconi, C, White, J, Fassan, M, Scarpa, A, Sottoriva, A & Valeri, N 2017, 'Carbon dating cancer: Defining the chronology of metastatic progression in colorectal cancer', Annals of Oncology, vol. 28, no. 6, mdx074, pp. 1243-1249. https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdx074
Lote H, Spiteri I, Ermini L, Vatsiou A, Roy A, McDonald A et al. Carbon dating cancer: Defining the chronology of metastatic progression in colorectal cancer. Annals of Oncology. 2017 Jun 1;28(6):1243-1249. mdx074. https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdx074
Lote, H. ; Spiteri, I. ; Ermini, L. ; Vatsiou, A. ; Roy, A. ; McDonald, A. ; Maka, N. ; Balsitis, M. ; Bose, N. ; Simbolo, M. ; Mafficini, A. ; Lampis, A. ; Hahne, J. C. ; Trevisani, F. ; Eltahir, Z. ; Mentrasti, G. ; Findlay, C. ; Kalkman, E. A.J. ; Punta, M. ; Werner, B. ; Lise, S. ; Aktipis, C Athena ; Maley, Carlo ; Greaves, M. ; Braconi, C. ; White, J. ; Fassan, M. ; Scarpa, A. ; Sottoriva, A. ; Valeri, N. / Carbon dating cancer : Defining the chronology of metastatic progression in colorectal cancer. In: Annals of Oncology. 2017 ; Vol. 28, No. 6. pp. 1243-1249.
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abstract = "Background: Patients often ask oncologists how long a cancer has been present before causing symptoms or spreading to other organs. The evolutionary trajectory of cancers can be defined using phylogenetic approaches but lack of chronological references makes dating the exact onset of tumours very challenging. Patients and methods: Here, we describe the case of a colorectal cancer (CRC) patient presenting with synchronous lung metastasis and metachronous thyroid, chest wall and urinary tract metastases over the course of 5 years. The chest wall metastasis was caused by needle tract seeding, implying a known time of onset. Using whole genome sequencing data from primary and metastatic sites we inferred the complete chronology of the cancer by exploiting the time of needle tract seeding as an in vivo 'stopwatch'. This approach allowed us to follow the progression of the disease back in time, dating each ancestral node of the phylogenetic tree in the past history of the tumour. We used a Bayesian phylogenomic approach, which accounts for possible dynamic changes in mutational rate, to reconstruct the phylogenetic tree and effectively 'carbon date' the malignant progression. Results: The primary colon cancer emerged between 5 and 8 years before the clinical diagnosis. The primary tumour metastasized to the lung and the thyroid within a year from its onset. The thyroid lesion presented as a tumour-to-tumour deposit within a benign Hurthle adenoma. Despite rapid metastatic progression from the primary tumour, the patient showed an indolent disease course. Primary cancer and metastases were microsatellite stable and displayed low chromosomal instability. Neo-antigen analysis suggested minimal immunogenicity. Conclusion: Our data provide the first in vivo experimental evidence documenting the timing of metastatic progression in CRC and suggest that genomic instability might be more important than themetastatic potential of the primary cancer in dictating CRC fate.",
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AU - Roy, A.

AU - McDonald, A.

AU - Maka, N.

AU - Balsitis, M.

AU - Bose, N.

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