Canine parvovirus enteritis, canine distemper, and major histocompatibility complex genetic variation in Mexican wolves

Philip W. Hedrick, Rhonda N. Lee, Colleen Buchanan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

The endangered Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) was recently reintroduced into Arizona and New Mexico (USA). In 1999 and 2000, pups from three litters that were part of the reintroduction program died of either canine parvovirus or canine distemper. Overall, half (seven of 14) of the pups died of either canine parvovirus or canine distemper. The parents and their litters were analyzed for variation at the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene DRB1. Similar MHC genes are related to disease resistance in other species. All six of the surviving pups genotyped for the MHC gene were heterozygous while five of the pups that died were heterozygous and one was homozygous. Resistance to pathogens is an important aspect of the management and long-term survival of endangered taxa, such as the Mexican wolf.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)909-913
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Wildlife Diseases
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2003

Keywords

  • Canine distemper
  • Canine parvovirus
  • Canis lupus baileyi
  • Endangered species
  • Genetics
  • Inbreeding
  • Wolves

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

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