Can self-report instruments of shoulder function capture functional differences in older adults with and without a rotator cuff tear?

Meghan E. Vidt, Anthony C. Santago, Eric J. Hegedus, Anthony P. Marsh, Christopher J. Tuohy, Gary G. Poehling, Michael T. Freehill, Michael E. Miller, Katherine R. Saul

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    8 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Rotator cuff tears (RCT) are prevalent in older individuals and may compound age-associated functional declines. Our purpose was to determine whether self-report measures of perceived functional ability are valid for older patients with RCT. Twenty five subjects participated (12M/13F; age = 63.9 ± 3.0 years); 13 with RCT and 12 controls (CON). Participants completed self-report measures of shoulder function (SST, ASES, WORC) and health-related quality of life (SF-36). Isometric joint moment and range of motion (ROM) were measured at the shoulder. Relationships among functional self-reports, and between these measures and joint moment and ROM were assessed; group differences for total and subcategory scores were evaluated. There were significant correlations among self-reports (rs = 0.62–0.71, p ⩽ 0.02). For RCT subjects, ASES was associated with all joint moments except adduction (p ⩽ 0.02); SST, ASES, and WORC were associated with abduction and external rotation ROM (p ⩽ 0.04). For RCT subjects, SST and WORC were associated with SF-36 physical function subcategory scores (p ⩽ 0.05). The RCT group scored worse than CON on all functional self-reports (p < 0.01) and WORC and ASES subcategories (p < 0.01). In conclusion, SST, ASES, and WORC demonstrate utility and discriminant validity for older individuals by distinguishing those with RCT, but this work suggests prioritizing ASES given its stronger association with functional group strength.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)90-99
    Number of pages10
    JournalJournal of Electromyography and Kinesiology
    Volume29
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

    Keywords

    • Activities of daily living
    • Aged
    • Range of motion
    • Rotator cuff
    • Self report
    • Strength
    • Upper extremity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
    • Biophysics
    • Clinical Neurology

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