Building the alphabetic principle in young children who are deaf or hard of hearing

Jessica Page Bergeron, Amy R. Lederberg, Susan R. Easterbrooks, Elizabeth Malone Miller, Carol McDonald Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acquisition of phoneme-grapheme correspondences, a key concept of the alphabetic principle, was examined in young children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) using a semantic association strategy embedded in two interventions, the Children's Early Intervention and Foundations for Literacy. Single-subject design experiments using multiple baselines across content were used to examine the functional relationship between student outcomes and the intervention provided. Only students who were able to identify spoken words were included in the studies. Study One was conducted with 5 children 3.10-7.10 years of age in oral or signing programs. Study Two was conducted with 5 children 3.10-4.5 years of age in an oral program. All children acquired taught phoneme-grapheme correspondences. These findings provide much-needed evidence that children who are DHH and who have some speech perception abilities can learn critical phoneme-grapheme correspondences through explicit auditory skill instruction with language and visual support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-119
Number of pages33
JournalVolta Review
Volume109
Issue number2-3
StatePublished - Sep 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hearing
Students
Speech Perception
Aptitude
Semantics
Young children
Alphabetic Principle
Deaf
Language
student
literacy
semantics
instruction
experiment
ability
Phoneme
Grapheme
language
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies

Cite this

Bergeron, J. P., Lederberg, A. R., Easterbrooks, S. R., Miller, E. M., & Connor, C. M. (2009). Building the alphabetic principle in young children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Volta Review, 109(2-3), 87-119.

Building the alphabetic principle in young children who are deaf or hard of hearing. / Bergeron, Jessica Page; Lederberg, Amy R.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.; Miller, Elizabeth Malone; Connor, Carol McDonald.

In: Volta Review, Vol. 109, No. 2-3, 09.2009, p. 87-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bergeron, JP, Lederberg, AR, Easterbrooks, SR, Miller, EM & Connor, CM 2009, 'Building the alphabetic principle in young children who are deaf or hard of hearing', Volta Review, vol. 109, no. 2-3, pp. 87-119.
Bergeron JP, Lederberg AR, Easterbrooks SR, Miller EM, Connor CM. Building the alphabetic principle in young children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Volta Review. 2009 Sep;109(2-3):87-119.
Bergeron, Jessica Page ; Lederberg, Amy R. ; Easterbrooks, Susan R. ; Miller, Elizabeth Malone ; Connor, Carol McDonald. / Building the alphabetic principle in young children who are deaf or hard of hearing. In: Volta Review. 2009 ; Vol. 109, No. 2-3. pp. 87-119.
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