Building relationships through accountability: An expanded idea of accountability

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Previous literature has focused on how external forces impose accountability on individuals (i.e., holding individuals to account), but has not considered the possibility of internal, personal accountability. We explain how an internalized sense of accountability, which we term internally assumed accountability, can enrich our understanding of why some organizational members might assume ownership for organizational problems, even ones that they did not actually cause. We offer a typology of accountability in organizations based on contrasting relationship norms and personal orientations. Our article concludes with a discussion on connections between different kinds of accountability and stakeholder relationships, suggesting a number of avenues for further investigation and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)184-206
Number of pages23
JournalOrganizational Psychology Review
Volume9
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

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Social Responsibility
Ownership
Accountability
Relationship building

Keywords

  • accountability
  • communal and exchange norms
  • stakeholder relationships
  • trust and commitment
  • typology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

Building relationships through accountability : An expanded idea of accountability. / Wang, Danni; Waldman, David A.; Ashforth, Blake E.

In: Organizational Psychology Review, Vol. 9, No. 2-3, 01.05.2019, p. 184-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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