Building-integrated carbon capture: Development of an appropriate and applicable building-integrated system for carbon capture and shade

Harvey Bryan, Fahad Ben Salamah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Building-integrated carbon capturing (BICC) represents a new approach to existing carbon capture technology called Moisture Swing Air Capture Technology, by attempting to integrate this carbon-capturing technology onto building facades. This approach treats building facades as giant artificial leaves that absorb carbon dioxide from the air and convert it into useful carbon-based materials without negatively impacting the environment. In this paper, we will explore how this technology can be modified to be installed on a building’s façade in the form of fabric shading devices that absorb carbon dioxide. A cleaning chamber moves along tracks (similar to a window-cleaning system) to moisten the fabric shades and dissolve the bicarbonate on the fibers. This process results in a carbonate and CO 2 liquid can be compressed and stored for use in a variety of industrial applications. We will use performance data from several non-building devices that have been previously developed and tested to generate the magnitude of the CO 2 that can be captured with this type of technology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-163
Number of pages9
JournalCivil Engineering and Architecture
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carbon capture
Facades
Carbon
Cleaning
Carbon dioxide
Air
Industrial applications
Carbonates
Moisture
Fibers
Liquids

Keywords

  • Building
  • Capture
  • Carbon
  • CO
  • Integration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Architecture

Cite this

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