Building ecology into the planning continuum: Case study of desert land preservation in Phoenix, Arizona (USA)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the past 20 years, the city of Phoenix, Arizona, USA has grown in area by 47%, with annexations totaling 156 square miles (404km 2) - six times the size of Manhattan. Most of the annexations have occurred to the north of the city center. Urban and suburban development has been spreading across the relatively flat terrain, resulting in the destruction of an acre of desert land per hour every hour of every day. Consequently, desert land preservation within the expanding city limits has become an issue of great concern. Beginning in 1993 with a citizen's advisory group, a multi-governmental and interdisciplinary collaboration in preservation planning has been growing in an effort to keep pace with urban and suburban expansion. This article follows the evolution of preservation planning in Phoenix as a case study with particular consideration given to how landscape ecological principles have been integrated into an existing land planning structure. The case study examines (1) historic desert land preservation planning efforts, beginning with the establishment of South Mountain Park in 1925, at 16,500 acres (6677ha) now the largest municipal park in the nation; (2) more recent preservation planning efforts including a 1995 interdisciplinary charrette focused on desert preservation and alternative forms of urban, suburban, and rural development in Phoenix; (3) ecological inventories and analyses that have influenced the desert land preservation planning process; (4) the development and implementation of the Sonoran Preserve Master Plan, the plan for a 21,500 acre (8701ha) desert preserve in the north Phoenix area (NPA).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-75
Number of pages23
JournalLandscape and Urban Planning
Volume68
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2004

Fingerprint

deserts
desert
planning
case studies
ecology
preserves
rural development
land
planning process
mountains
mountain

Keywords

  • Case study methods
  • City of Phoenix
  • Landscape ecological planning
  • Landscape preservation
  • Sonoran desert
  • Sonoran Preserve Master Plan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

@article{731b7be5a0974bfc8186cff8ebdf22d6,
title = "Building ecology into the planning continuum: Case study of desert land preservation in Phoenix, Arizona (USA)",
abstract = "In the past 20 years, the city of Phoenix, Arizona, USA has grown in area by 47{\%}, with annexations totaling 156 square miles (404km 2) - six times the size of Manhattan. Most of the annexations have occurred to the north of the city center. Urban and suburban development has been spreading across the relatively flat terrain, resulting in the destruction of an acre of desert land per hour every hour of every day. Consequently, desert land preservation within the expanding city limits has become an issue of great concern. Beginning in 1993 with a citizen's advisory group, a multi-governmental and interdisciplinary collaboration in preservation planning has been growing in an effort to keep pace with urban and suburban expansion. This article follows the evolution of preservation planning in Phoenix as a case study with particular consideration given to how landscape ecological principles have been integrated into an existing land planning structure. The case study examines (1) historic desert land preservation planning efforts, beginning with the establishment of South Mountain Park in 1925, at 16,500 acres (6677ha) now the largest municipal park in the nation; (2) more recent preservation planning efforts including a 1995 interdisciplinary charrette focused on desert preservation and alternative forms of urban, suburban, and rural development in Phoenix; (3) ecological inventories and analyses that have influenced the desert land preservation planning process; (4) the development and implementation of the Sonoran Preserve Master Plan, the plan for a 21,500 acre (8701ha) desert preserve in the north Phoenix area (NPA).",
keywords = "Case study methods, City of Phoenix, Landscape ecological planning, Landscape preservation, Sonoran desert, Sonoran Preserve Master Plan",
author = "Joseph Ewan and {Fish Ewan}, Rebecca and James Burke",
year = "2004",
month = "5",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/S0169-2046(03)00166-X",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "68",
pages = "53--75",
journal = "Landscape and Urban Planning",
issn = "0169-2046",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Building ecology into the planning continuum

T2 - Case study of desert land preservation in Phoenix, Arizona (USA)

AU - Ewan, Joseph

AU - Fish Ewan, Rebecca

AU - Burke, James

PY - 2004/5/15

Y1 - 2004/5/15

N2 - In the past 20 years, the city of Phoenix, Arizona, USA has grown in area by 47%, with annexations totaling 156 square miles (404km 2) - six times the size of Manhattan. Most of the annexations have occurred to the north of the city center. Urban and suburban development has been spreading across the relatively flat terrain, resulting in the destruction of an acre of desert land per hour every hour of every day. Consequently, desert land preservation within the expanding city limits has become an issue of great concern. Beginning in 1993 with a citizen's advisory group, a multi-governmental and interdisciplinary collaboration in preservation planning has been growing in an effort to keep pace with urban and suburban expansion. This article follows the evolution of preservation planning in Phoenix as a case study with particular consideration given to how landscape ecological principles have been integrated into an existing land planning structure. The case study examines (1) historic desert land preservation planning efforts, beginning with the establishment of South Mountain Park in 1925, at 16,500 acres (6677ha) now the largest municipal park in the nation; (2) more recent preservation planning efforts including a 1995 interdisciplinary charrette focused on desert preservation and alternative forms of urban, suburban, and rural development in Phoenix; (3) ecological inventories and analyses that have influenced the desert land preservation planning process; (4) the development and implementation of the Sonoran Preserve Master Plan, the plan for a 21,500 acre (8701ha) desert preserve in the north Phoenix area (NPA).

AB - In the past 20 years, the city of Phoenix, Arizona, USA has grown in area by 47%, with annexations totaling 156 square miles (404km 2) - six times the size of Manhattan. Most of the annexations have occurred to the north of the city center. Urban and suburban development has been spreading across the relatively flat terrain, resulting in the destruction of an acre of desert land per hour every hour of every day. Consequently, desert land preservation within the expanding city limits has become an issue of great concern. Beginning in 1993 with a citizen's advisory group, a multi-governmental and interdisciplinary collaboration in preservation planning has been growing in an effort to keep pace with urban and suburban expansion. This article follows the evolution of preservation planning in Phoenix as a case study with particular consideration given to how landscape ecological principles have been integrated into an existing land planning structure. The case study examines (1) historic desert land preservation planning efforts, beginning with the establishment of South Mountain Park in 1925, at 16,500 acres (6677ha) now the largest municipal park in the nation; (2) more recent preservation planning efforts including a 1995 interdisciplinary charrette focused on desert preservation and alternative forms of urban, suburban, and rural development in Phoenix; (3) ecological inventories and analyses that have influenced the desert land preservation planning process; (4) the development and implementation of the Sonoran Preserve Master Plan, the plan for a 21,500 acre (8701ha) desert preserve in the north Phoenix area (NPA).

KW - Case study methods

KW - City of Phoenix

KW - Landscape ecological planning

KW - Landscape preservation

KW - Sonoran desert

KW - Sonoran Preserve Master Plan

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1642284511&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1642284511&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0169-2046(03)00166-X

DO - 10.1016/S0169-2046(03)00166-X

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:1642284511

VL - 68

SP - 53

EP - 75

JO - Landscape and Urban Planning

JF - Landscape and Urban Planning

SN - 0169-2046

IS - 1

ER -