Broadband seismic background noise at temporary seismic stations observed on a regional scale in the Southwestern United States

David Wilson, Joseph Leon, Richard Aster, James Ni, John Schlue, Steve Grand, Steven Semken, Scott Baldridge, Wei Gao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background noise power spectral density (PSD) estimates for 54 PASSCAL Colorado Plateau/Rio Grande Rift/Great Plains Seismic Transect (LA RISTRA) stations were computed using data from 1999 to 2000. At long periods (0.01-0.1 Hz), typical vertical noise levels are approximately 12 dB higher than the nearby Global Seismic Network (GSN) borehole station ANMO, but horizontal power spectral density (PSD) noise levels are approximately 30 dB higher. Long-period noise levels exhibit essentially no spatial correlation along the LA RISTRA transect, indicating that local thermal or atmosphere-driven local slab tilt is the dominant source of noise in this band. Between 0.1 and 0.3 Hz, typical noise levels are dominated by naturally occurring microseismic noise and are essentially identical to those observed at ANMO. At short periods, 0.3-8 Hz, typical noise levels along the network exceed ANMO levels by approximately 15 dB, with the highest levels corresponding to proximity to cultural noise sources. No significant day/night variations were observed in the microseismic band; however, both low- and high-frequency noise levels show an increase of up to 8 dB in median midday versus midnight noise levels. We find that the major shortcomings of these shallow PASSCAL-style temporary vaults relative to a GSN-style borehole installation are increased susceptibility to long-period horizontal (≥20 sec) noise and to surface noise sources above approximately 2 Hz. Although the high-frequency near-surface noise field is unavoidable in shallow vaults, we suggest that increased understanding and mitigation of local tilt effects in shallow vaults offers the possibility of significantly improving the long-period noise environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3335-3341
Number of pages7
JournalBulletin of the Seismological Society of America
Volume92
Issue number8
StatePublished - Dec 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Power spectral density
background noise
Boreholes
stations
broadband
tilt
transect
borehole
boreholes
noise level
station
slab
mitigation
Colorado Plateau (US)
plateau
Rio Grande (North America)
atmosphere
Hot Temperature
plains
night

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics

Cite this

Broadband seismic background noise at temporary seismic stations observed on a regional scale in the Southwestern United States. / Wilson, David; Leon, Joseph; Aster, Richard; Ni, James; Schlue, John; Grand, Steve; Semken, Steven; Baldridge, Scott; Gao, Wei.

In: Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 92, No. 8, 12.2002, p. 3335-3341.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, David ; Leon, Joseph ; Aster, Richard ; Ni, James ; Schlue, John ; Grand, Steve ; Semken, Steven ; Baldridge, Scott ; Gao, Wei. / Broadband seismic background noise at temporary seismic stations observed on a regional scale in the Southwestern United States. In: Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 2002 ; Vol. 92, No. 8. pp. 3335-3341.
@article{e639ddada07f46e1bcd9e7ba061aa691,
title = "Broadband seismic background noise at temporary seismic stations observed on a regional scale in the Southwestern United States",
abstract = "Background noise power spectral density (PSD) estimates for 54 PASSCAL Colorado Plateau/Rio Grande Rift/Great Plains Seismic Transect (LA RISTRA) stations were computed using data from 1999 to 2000. At long periods (0.01-0.1 Hz), typical vertical noise levels are approximately 12 dB higher than the nearby Global Seismic Network (GSN) borehole station ANMO, but horizontal power spectral density (PSD) noise levels are approximately 30 dB higher. Long-period noise levels exhibit essentially no spatial correlation along the LA RISTRA transect, indicating that local thermal or atmosphere-driven local slab tilt is the dominant source of noise in this band. Between 0.1 and 0.3 Hz, typical noise levels are dominated by naturally occurring microseismic noise and are essentially identical to those observed at ANMO. At short periods, 0.3-8 Hz, typical noise levels along the network exceed ANMO levels by approximately 15 dB, with the highest levels corresponding to proximity to cultural noise sources. No significant day/night variations were observed in the microseismic band; however, both low- and high-frequency noise levels show an increase of up to 8 dB in median midday versus midnight noise levels. We find that the major shortcomings of these shallow PASSCAL-style temporary vaults relative to a GSN-style borehole installation are increased susceptibility to long-period horizontal (≥20 sec) noise and to surface noise sources above approximately 2 Hz. Although the high-frequency near-surface noise field is unavoidable in shallow vaults, we suggest that increased understanding and mitigation of local tilt effects in shallow vaults offers the possibility of significantly improving the long-period noise environment.",
author = "David Wilson and Joseph Leon and Richard Aster and James Ni and John Schlue and Steve Grand and Steven Semken and Scott Baldridge and Wei Gao",
year = "2002",
month = "12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "92",
pages = "3335--3341",
journal = "Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America",
issn = "0037-1106",
publisher = "Seismological Society of America",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Broadband seismic background noise at temporary seismic stations observed on a regional scale in the Southwestern United States

AU - Wilson, David

AU - Leon, Joseph

AU - Aster, Richard

AU - Ni, James

AU - Schlue, John

AU - Grand, Steve

AU - Semken, Steven

AU - Baldridge, Scott

AU - Gao, Wei

PY - 2002/12

Y1 - 2002/12

N2 - Background noise power spectral density (PSD) estimates for 54 PASSCAL Colorado Plateau/Rio Grande Rift/Great Plains Seismic Transect (LA RISTRA) stations were computed using data from 1999 to 2000. At long periods (0.01-0.1 Hz), typical vertical noise levels are approximately 12 dB higher than the nearby Global Seismic Network (GSN) borehole station ANMO, but horizontal power spectral density (PSD) noise levels are approximately 30 dB higher. Long-period noise levels exhibit essentially no spatial correlation along the LA RISTRA transect, indicating that local thermal or atmosphere-driven local slab tilt is the dominant source of noise in this band. Between 0.1 and 0.3 Hz, typical noise levels are dominated by naturally occurring microseismic noise and are essentially identical to those observed at ANMO. At short periods, 0.3-8 Hz, typical noise levels along the network exceed ANMO levels by approximately 15 dB, with the highest levels corresponding to proximity to cultural noise sources. No significant day/night variations were observed in the microseismic band; however, both low- and high-frequency noise levels show an increase of up to 8 dB in median midday versus midnight noise levels. We find that the major shortcomings of these shallow PASSCAL-style temporary vaults relative to a GSN-style borehole installation are increased susceptibility to long-period horizontal (≥20 sec) noise and to surface noise sources above approximately 2 Hz. Although the high-frequency near-surface noise field is unavoidable in shallow vaults, we suggest that increased understanding and mitigation of local tilt effects in shallow vaults offers the possibility of significantly improving the long-period noise environment.

AB - Background noise power spectral density (PSD) estimates for 54 PASSCAL Colorado Plateau/Rio Grande Rift/Great Plains Seismic Transect (LA RISTRA) stations were computed using data from 1999 to 2000. At long periods (0.01-0.1 Hz), typical vertical noise levels are approximately 12 dB higher than the nearby Global Seismic Network (GSN) borehole station ANMO, but horizontal power spectral density (PSD) noise levels are approximately 30 dB higher. Long-period noise levels exhibit essentially no spatial correlation along the LA RISTRA transect, indicating that local thermal or atmosphere-driven local slab tilt is the dominant source of noise in this band. Between 0.1 and 0.3 Hz, typical noise levels are dominated by naturally occurring microseismic noise and are essentially identical to those observed at ANMO. At short periods, 0.3-8 Hz, typical noise levels along the network exceed ANMO levels by approximately 15 dB, with the highest levels corresponding to proximity to cultural noise sources. No significant day/night variations were observed in the microseismic band; however, both low- and high-frequency noise levels show an increase of up to 8 dB in median midday versus midnight noise levels. We find that the major shortcomings of these shallow PASSCAL-style temporary vaults relative to a GSN-style borehole installation are increased susceptibility to long-period horizontal (≥20 sec) noise and to surface noise sources above approximately 2 Hz. Although the high-frequency near-surface noise field is unavoidable in shallow vaults, we suggest that increased understanding and mitigation of local tilt effects in shallow vaults offers the possibility of significantly improving the long-period noise environment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036946782&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036946782&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 92

SP - 3335

EP - 3341

JO - Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America

JF - Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America

SN - 0037-1106

IS - 8

ER -