Brief report: Contextual predictors of African American adolescents' ethnic-racial identity affirmation-belonging andresistance to peer pressure

Chelsea L. Derlan, Adriana J. Umaña-Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study examined whether contextual factors (i.e., familial cultural socialization, percentage of same-ethnicity friends in high school, and neighborhood ethnic-racial composition) predicted ethnic-racial identity affirmation-belonging and, in turn, resistance to peer pressure to engage in problem behavior. Participants were 250 African American adolescents (. M age=15.57 years; SD=1.22). Consistent with ecological theory, findings indicated that familial cultural socialization and percentage of same-ethnicity friends predicted greater ethnic-racial identity affirmation-belonging. Furthermore, consistent with notions from social identity theory, youth who reported higher ethnic-racial identity affirmation-belonging also reported greater resistance to peer pressure. Findings highlight the significance of the family and school context, as well as the importance of ethnic-racial identity affirmation-belonging, for African American youths' positive development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Adolescence
Volume41
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Keywords

  • Adjustment
  • Adolescents
  • African American/Black
  • Cultural/ethnic/racial socialization
  • Ethnic/racial identity
  • Same-ethnicity/same-race friends

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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