Breast Cancer and Dietary Intake of Endocrine Disruptors: a Review of Recent Literature

Devin A. Bowes, Rolf Halden

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Purpose of Review: In women, breast cancer is the second most common cause of death. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can interfere with hormone signaling, possibly linking to cancer. Among these, estrogen-mimicking endocrine disruptors (EEDs) infiltrate the human diet and are known to bind to estrogen receptors. Recent Findings: We reviewed recent literature (n = 13 papers) examining associations between dietary intake of EEDs and breast cancer incidence. Collectively, this sample of investigations suggest a positive correlation, including bisphenol A (BPA) (0.4–4.2 μg/kg-bw/day), phytoestrogens (sum of genistein and daidzein; 1000–3000 μg/kg-bw/day), and pesticides, specifically dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) (0.03 μg/kg-bw/day) and atrazine (0.033–0.0123 μg/kg-bw/day collectively). Evidence for linkages between breast cancer and exposure to additional EDCs/EEDs from dietary intake was weaker, e.g., phthalates and parabens whose exposure routes were dominated by inhalation and dermal absorption. Summary: Body burdens with EEDs potentially causing physiological disruption were demonstrated for BPA (50 μg/kg adipose tissue/day), phytoestrogens (300 μg/kg adipose tissue/day), and DDT (250 μg/kg adipose tissue/day) and atrazine (25,000 μg/kg adipose tissue/day). Opportunities for reducing unwanted dietary exposures to estrogen mimics were evaluated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Pathobiology Reports
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Endocrine Disruptors
Breast Neoplasms
Adipose Tissue
Atrazine
Phytoestrogens
Estrogens
Endocrine Gland Neoplasms
Parabens
Body Burden
Skin Absorption
Genistein
Pesticides
Estrogen Receptors
Inhalation
Cause of Death
Hormones
Diet
Incidence
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Diet
  • EDCs
  • EEDs
  • Environment
  • Estrogen
  • Estrogen-mimicking endocrine disruptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Breast Cancer and Dietary Intake of Endocrine Disruptors : a Review of Recent Literature. / Bowes, Devin A.; Halden, Rolf.

In: Current Pathobiology Reports, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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