Breaking Stereotypes and School Punishment: Family Socioeconomic Status, Test Scores, Academic and Sport Activities, Backlash, and Racial and Ethnic Discipline Disparities

Anthony A. Peguero, Ann Marie Popp, Zahra Shekarkhar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The disproportionate punishment of racial and ethnic minority adolescents is a serious problem within schools. Few studies, however, consider factors outside of school misbehavior that may moderate this relationship. This study extends research on this topic by considering whether stereotypes moderate the school punishment of racial and ethnic minorities. This study utilizes multilevel modeling techniques to examine whether and how stereotypes based on family socioeconomic status, test scores, and school-based activities moderate racial and ethnic minority adolescents’ odds of being punished. Adolescents who do not conform to racial and ethnic stereotypes are more likely to be punished. The findings that suggest that stereotypes may be linked to increased school punishment for racial and ethnic minorities are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-85
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2015
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Law

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