Boys must be men, and men must have sex with women: A qualitative CBPR study to explore sexual risk among African American, Latino, and White gay men and MSM

Scott D. Rhodes, Kenneth C. Hergenrather, Aaron T. Vissman, Jason Stowers, A. Bernard Davis, Anthony Hannah, Jorge Alonzo, Flavio Marsiglia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV and sexually transmitted diseases. This study was designed to explore sexual risk among MSM using community-based participatory research (CBPR). An academic-community partnership conducted nine focus groups with 88 MSM. Participants self-identified as African American/Black (n = 28), Hispanic/Latino (n = 33), White (n = 21), and biracial/ethnic (n = 6). The mean age was 27 years (range = 18-60 years). Grounded theory was used. Twelve themes related to HIV risk emerged, including low knowledge of HIV and sexually transmitted diseases, particularly among Latino MSM and MSM who use the Internet for sexual networking; stereotyping of African American MSM as sexually "dominant" and Latino MSM as less likely to be HIV infected; and the eroticization of "barebacking." Twelve intervention approaches also were identified, including developing culturally congruent programming using community-identified assets, harnessing social media used by informal networks of MSM, and promoting protection within the context of intimate relationships. A community forum was held to develop recommendations and move these themes to action.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-151
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Men's Health
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

Community-Based Participatory Research
Qualitative Research
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
HIV
sexually transmitted disease
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
community
Social Media
Stereotyping
Focus Groups
social media
grounded theory
Internet
networking
assets
programming
Sexual Minorities
American
Group

Keywords

  • Gay health issues
  • Health promotion and disease prevention
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Immigrants
  • Men of color

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Boys must be men, and men must have sex with women : A qualitative CBPR study to explore sexual risk among African American, Latino, and White gay men and MSM. / Rhodes, Scott D.; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.; Vissman, Aaron T.; Stowers, Jason; Davis, A. Bernard; Hannah, Anthony; Alonzo, Jorge; Marsiglia, Flavio.

In: American Journal of Men's Health, Vol. 5, No. 2, 03.2011, p. 140-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rhodes, Scott D. ; Hergenrather, Kenneth C. ; Vissman, Aaron T. ; Stowers, Jason ; Davis, A. Bernard ; Hannah, Anthony ; Alonzo, Jorge ; Marsiglia, Flavio. / Boys must be men, and men must have sex with women : A qualitative CBPR study to explore sexual risk among African American, Latino, and White gay men and MSM. In: American Journal of Men's Health. 2011 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 140-151.
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