Biotic and abiotic factors predicting the global distribution and population density of an invasive large mammal

Jesse Lewis, Matthew L. Farnsworth, Chris L. Burdett, David M. Theobald, Miranda Gray, Ryan S. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biotic and abiotic factors are increasingly acknowledged to synergistically shape broad-scale species distributions. However, the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors in predicting species distributions is unclear. In particular, biotic factors, such as predation and vegetation, including those resulting from anthropogenic land-use change, are underrepresented in species distribution modeling, but could improve model predictions. Using generalized linear models and model selection techniques, we used 129 estimates of population density of wild pigs (Sus scrofa) from 5 continents to evaluate the relative importance, magnitude, and direction of biotic and abiotic factors in predicting population density of an invasive large mammal with a global distribution. Incorporating diverse biotic factors, including agriculture, vegetation cover, and large carnivore richness, into species distribution modeling substantially improved model fit and predictions. Abiotic factors, including precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, were also important predictors. The predictive map of population density revealed wide-ranging potential for an invasive large mammal to expand its distribution globally. This information can be used to proactively create conservation/management plans to control future invasions. Our study demonstrates that the ongoing paradigm shift, which recognizes that both biotic and abiotic factors shape species distributions across broad scales, can be advanced by incorporating diverse biotic factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number44152
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 9 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

biotic factor
population density
mammal
paradigm shift
potential evapotranspiration
conservation management
carnivore
prediction
abiotic factor
distribution
pig
vegetation cover
modeling
land use change
predation
agriculture
vegetation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Biotic and abiotic factors predicting the global distribution and population density of an invasive large mammal. / Lewis, Jesse; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Burdett, Chris L.; Theobald, David M.; Gray, Miranda; Miller, Ryan S.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, 44152, 09.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lewis, Jesse ; Farnsworth, Matthew L. ; Burdett, Chris L. ; Theobald, David M. ; Gray, Miranda ; Miller, Ryan S. / Biotic and abiotic factors predicting the global distribution and population density of an invasive large mammal. In: Scientific Reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7.
@article{12b952dad11c43068cc8ebeadfd41409,
title = "Biotic and abiotic factors predicting the global distribution and population density of an invasive large mammal",
abstract = "Biotic and abiotic factors are increasingly acknowledged to synergistically shape broad-scale species distributions. However, the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors in predicting species distributions is unclear. In particular, biotic factors, such as predation and vegetation, including those resulting from anthropogenic land-use change, are underrepresented in species distribution modeling, but could improve model predictions. Using generalized linear models and model selection techniques, we used 129 estimates of population density of wild pigs (Sus scrofa) from 5 continents to evaluate the relative importance, magnitude, and direction of biotic and abiotic factors in predicting population density of an invasive large mammal with a global distribution. Incorporating diverse biotic factors, including agriculture, vegetation cover, and large carnivore richness, into species distribution modeling substantially improved model fit and predictions. Abiotic factors, including precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, were also important predictors. The predictive map of population density revealed wide-ranging potential for an invasive large mammal to expand its distribution globally. This information can be used to proactively create conservation/management plans to control future invasions. Our study demonstrates that the ongoing paradigm shift, which recognizes that both biotic and abiotic factors shape species distributions across broad scales, can be advanced by incorporating diverse biotic factors.",
author = "Jesse Lewis and Farnsworth, {Matthew L.} and Burdett, {Chris L.} and Theobald, {David M.} and Miranda Gray and Miller, {Ryan S.}",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1038/srep44152",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biotic and abiotic factors predicting the global distribution and population density of an invasive large mammal

AU - Lewis, Jesse

AU - Farnsworth, Matthew L.

AU - Burdett, Chris L.

AU - Theobald, David M.

AU - Gray, Miranda

AU - Miller, Ryan S.

PY - 2017/3/9

Y1 - 2017/3/9

N2 - Biotic and abiotic factors are increasingly acknowledged to synergistically shape broad-scale species distributions. However, the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors in predicting species distributions is unclear. In particular, biotic factors, such as predation and vegetation, including those resulting from anthropogenic land-use change, are underrepresented in species distribution modeling, but could improve model predictions. Using generalized linear models and model selection techniques, we used 129 estimates of population density of wild pigs (Sus scrofa) from 5 continents to evaluate the relative importance, magnitude, and direction of biotic and abiotic factors in predicting population density of an invasive large mammal with a global distribution. Incorporating diverse biotic factors, including agriculture, vegetation cover, and large carnivore richness, into species distribution modeling substantially improved model fit and predictions. Abiotic factors, including precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, were also important predictors. The predictive map of population density revealed wide-ranging potential for an invasive large mammal to expand its distribution globally. This information can be used to proactively create conservation/management plans to control future invasions. Our study demonstrates that the ongoing paradigm shift, which recognizes that both biotic and abiotic factors shape species distributions across broad scales, can be advanced by incorporating diverse biotic factors.

AB - Biotic and abiotic factors are increasingly acknowledged to synergistically shape broad-scale species distributions. However, the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors in predicting species distributions is unclear. In particular, biotic factors, such as predation and vegetation, including those resulting from anthropogenic land-use change, are underrepresented in species distribution modeling, but could improve model predictions. Using generalized linear models and model selection techniques, we used 129 estimates of population density of wild pigs (Sus scrofa) from 5 continents to evaluate the relative importance, magnitude, and direction of biotic and abiotic factors in predicting population density of an invasive large mammal with a global distribution. Incorporating diverse biotic factors, including agriculture, vegetation cover, and large carnivore richness, into species distribution modeling substantially improved model fit and predictions. Abiotic factors, including precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, were also important predictors. The predictive map of population density revealed wide-ranging potential for an invasive large mammal to expand its distribution globally. This information can be used to proactively create conservation/management plans to control future invasions. Our study demonstrates that the ongoing paradigm shift, which recognizes that both biotic and abiotic factors shape species distributions across broad scales, can be advanced by incorporating diverse biotic factors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85014827370&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85014827370&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/srep44152

DO - 10.1038/srep44152

M3 - Article

C2 - 28276519

AN - SCOPUS:85014827370

VL - 7

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

M1 - 44152

ER -