Biogeochemical cycling of PCBs in lakes of variable trophic status: A paired-lake experiment

Jeff D. Jeremiason, Steven J. Eisenreich, Michael J. Paterson, Ken G. Beaty, Robert Hecky, James Elser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A paired whole-lake experiment was conducted on two remote, atmospherically driven lakes in the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) to examine the stresses of trophic condition on air-water exchange and settling fluxes of poly-chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Lake 227 (L227) and Lake 110 (L110) are similar in volume, surface area, and watershed area but differ significantly in trophic status. The two lakes have similar access to atmospheric PCBs but eutrophic L227 may exhibit enhanced air to water exchange due to greater biotic uptake of dissolved PCBs. Settling fluxes of PCB were significantly greater in eutrophic L227 (40 ng m-2 d-1 in 1993; 29 ng m-2 d-1 in 1994) than in oligotrophic L110 (22 ng m-2 d-1 in 1993 and 17 ng m-2 d-1 in 1994). Dissolved ΣPCB concentrations were not significantly different in the two lakes (~0.3 ng liter-1). Greater ΣPCB settling fluxes in L227 vs. L110 coupled with similar dissolved concentrations after June supports the hypothesis that air-water exchange supports the water column PCB concentrations. Surprisingly, ΣPCB fugacity gradients in both lakes indicated that net volatilization dominated during the entire ice-free period, requiting another source. A ΣPCB mass budget in the epilimnion of each lake over the stratified period showed that the major PCB losses were due to settling and volatilization. ΣPCB settling losses were 2.4 times greater in L227 than in L110 due to higher settling particle fluxes. The mass budgets suggest that the major PCB input to these remote lakes is from the watershed. Our results indicate the intimate environmental linkage between atmospheric, land, and aquatic PCB reservoirs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)889-902
Number of pages14
JournalLimnology and Oceanography
Volume44
Issue number3 II
StatePublished - May 1999

Fingerprint

trophic status
biphenyl
lakes
lake
experiment
water exchange
trophic levels
volatilization
air
water
watershed
trophic conditions
particle settling
epilimnion
fugacity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Oceanography

Cite this

Jeremiason, J. D., Eisenreich, S. J., Paterson, M. J., Beaty, K. G., Hecky, R., & Elser, J. (1999). Biogeochemical cycling of PCBs in lakes of variable trophic status: A paired-lake experiment. Limnology and Oceanography, 44(3 II), 889-902.

Biogeochemical cycling of PCBs in lakes of variable trophic status : A paired-lake experiment. / Jeremiason, Jeff D.; Eisenreich, Steven J.; Paterson, Michael J.; Beaty, Ken G.; Hecky, Robert; Elser, James.

In: Limnology and Oceanography, Vol. 44, No. 3 II, 05.1999, p. 889-902.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jeremiason, JD, Eisenreich, SJ, Paterson, MJ, Beaty, KG, Hecky, R & Elser, J 1999, 'Biogeochemical cycling of PCBs in lakes of variable trophic status: A paired-lake experiment', Limnology and Oceanography, vol. 44, no. 3 II, pp. 889-902.
Jeremiason JD, Eisenreich SJ, Paterson MJ, Beaty KG, Hecky R, Elser J. Biogeochemical cycling of PCBs in lakes of variable trophic status: A paired-lake experiment. Limnology and Oceanography. 1999 May;44(3 II):889-902.
Jeremiason, Jeff D. ; Eisenreich, Steven J. ; Paterson, Michael J. ; Beaty, Ken G. ; Hecky, Robert ; Elser, James. / Biogeochemical cycling of PCBs in lakes of variable trophic status : A paired-lake experiment. In: Limnology and Oceanography. 1999 ; Vol. 44, No. 3 II. pp. 889-902.
@article{bf63a9bcbff945a6a41c66471523733a,
title = "Biogeochemical cycling of PCBs in lakes of variable trophic status: A paired-lake experiment",
abstract = "A paired whole-lake experiment was conducted on two remote, atmospherically driven lakes in the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) to examine the stresses of trophic condition on air-water exchange and settling fluxes of poly-chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Lake 227 (L227) and Lake 110 (L110) are similar in volume, surface area, and watershed area but differ significantly in trophic status. The two lakes have similar access to atmospheric PCBs but eutrophic L227 may exhibit enhanced air to water exchange due to greater biotic uptake of dissolved PCBs. Settling fluxes of PCB were significantly greater in eutrophic L227 (40 ng m-2 d-1 in 1993; 29 ng m-2 d-1 in 1994) than in oligotrophic L110 (22 ng m-2 d-1 in 1993 and 17 ng m-2 d-1 in 1994). Dissolved ΣPCB concentrations were not significantly different in the two lakes (~0.3 ng liter-1). Greater ΣPCB settling fluxes in L227 vs. L110 coupled with similar dissolved concentrations after June supports the hypothesis that air-water exchange supports the water column PCB concentrations. Surprisingly, ΣPCB fugacity gradients in both lakes indicated that net volatilization dominated during the entire ice-free period, requiting another source. A ΣPCB mass budget in the epilimnion of each lake over the stratified period showed that the major PCB losses were due to settling and volatilization. ΣPCB settling losses were 2.4 times greater in L227 than in L110 due to higher settling particle fluxes. The mass budgets suggest that the major PCB input to these remote lakes is from the watershed. Our results indicate the intimate environmental linkage between atmospheric, land, and aquatic PCB reservoirs.",
author = "Jeremiason, {Jeff D.} and Eisenreich, {Steven J.} and Paterson, {Michael J.} and Beaty, {Ken G.} and Robert Hecky and James Elser",
year = "1999",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "889--902",
journal = "Limnology and Oceanography",
issn = "0024-3590",
publisher = "American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Inc.",
number = "3 II",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biogeochemical cycling of PCBs in lakes of variable trophic status

T2 - A paired-lake experiment

AU - Jeremiason, Jeff D.

AU - Eisenreich, Steven J.

AU - Paterson, Michael J.

AU - Beaty, Ken G.

AU - Hecky, Robert

AU - Elser, James

PY - 1999/5

Y1 - 1999/5

N2 - A paired whole-lake experiment was conducted on two remote, atmospherically driven lakes in the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) to examine the stresses of trophic condition on air-water exchange and settling fluxes of poly-chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Lake 227 (L227) and Lake 110 (L110) are similar in volume, surface area, and watershed area but differ significantly in trophic status. The two lakes have similar access to atmospheric PCBs but eutrophic L227 may exhibit enhanced air to water exchange due to greater biotic uptake of dissolved PCBs. Settling fluxes of PCB were significantly greater in eutrophic L227 (40 ng m-2 d-1 in 1993; 29 ng m-2 d-1 in 1994) than in oligotrophic L110 (22 ng m-2 d-1 in 1993 and 17 ng m-2 d-1 in 1994). Dissolved ΣPCB concentrations were not significantly different in the two lakes (~0.3 ng liter-1). Greater ΣPCB settling fluxes in L227 vs. L110 coupled with similar dissolved concentrations after June supports the hypothesis that air-water exchange supports the water column PCB concentrations. Surprisingly, ΣPCB fugacity gradients in both lakes indicated that net volatilization dominated during the entire ice-free period, requiting another source. A ΣPCB mass budget in the epilimnion of each lake over the stratified period showed that the major PCB losses were due to settling and volatilization. ΣPCB settling losses were 2.4 times greater in L227 than in L110 due to higher settling particle fluxes. The mass budgets suggest that the major PCB input to these remote lakes is from the watershed. Our results indicate the intimate environmental linkage between atmospheric, land, and aquatic PCB reservoirs.

AB - A paired whole-lake experiment was conducted on two remote, atmospherically driven lakes in the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) to examine the stresses of trophic condition on air-water exchange and settling fluxes of poly-chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Lake 227 (L227) and Lake 110 (L110) are similar in volume, surface area, and watershed area but differ significantly in trophic status. The two lakes have similar access to atmospheric PCBs but eutrophic L227 may exhibit enhanced air to water exchange due to greater biotic uptake of dissolved PCBs. Settling fluxes of PCB were significantly greater in eutrophic L227 (40 ng m-2 d-1 in 1993; 29 ng m-2 d-1 in 1994) than in oligotrophic L110 (22 ng m-2 d-1 in 1993 and 17 ng m-2 d-1 in 1994). Dissolved ΣPCB concentrations were not significantly different in the two lakes (~0.3 ng liter-1). Greater ΣPCB settling fluxes in L227 vs. L110 coupled with similar dissolved concentrations after June supports the hypothesis that air-water exchange supports the water column PCB concentrations. Surprisingly, ΣPCB fugacity gradients in both lakes indicated that net volatilization dominated during the entire ice-free period, requiting another source. A ΣPCB mass budget in the epilimnion of each lake over the stratified period showed that the major PCB losses were due to settling and volatilization. ΣPCB settling losses were 2.4 times greater in L227 than in L110 due to higher settling particle fluxes. The mass budgets suggest that the major PCB input to these remote lakes is from the watershed. Our results indicate the intimate environmental linkage between atmospheric, land, and aquatic PCB reservoirs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032908348&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032908348&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0032908348

VL - 44

SP - 889

EP - 902

JO - Limnology and Oceanography

JF - Limnology and Oceanography

SN - 0024-3590

IS - 3 II

ER -