Beyond the red tape: How victims of terrorism perceive and react to organizational responses to their suffering

David Waldman, Abraham Carmeli, Meyrav Yitzack Halevi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We use a storyteller perspective to examine how victims of terrorism perceive the way that organizations react and respond to their needs in the aftermath of terrorist attacks. Analysis of the data shows that organizations in Israel are often perceived as ineffective to respond in a humane or compassionate manner to the suffering caused by terrorism. Instead, victims perceive that a more bureaucratic approach is taken. However, to create optimal public value, compassionate responses on the part of organizations in times of trauma, such as terrorist attacks, may be required. We build a theoretical model to show how positive deviance can bring about such responses, as well as positive outcomes for victims.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)938-954
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Terrorism
Psychological Stress
terrorism
Organizations
Israel
deviant behavior
trauma
Theoretical Models
Wounds and Injuries
Red tape
Values
Terrorist attack

Keywords

  • Compassion
  • Crisis
  • Humane responses
  • Interactional justice
  • Positive deviance
  • Public value
  • Resilience
  • Terrorism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Beyond the red tape : How victims of terrorism perceive and react to organizational responses to their suffering. / Waldman, David; Carmeli, Abraham; Halevi, Meyrav Yitzack.

In: Journal of Organizational Behavior, Vol. 32, No. 7, 10.2011, p. 938-954.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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