Beyond the reading wars

Exploring the effect of child-instruction interactions on growth in early reading

Carol McDonald Connor, Frederick J. Morrison, Leslie E. Katch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

183 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the influence of interactions between first graders' fall language-literacy skills (vocabulary and decoding) and classroom instructional practices on their spring decoding scores. Instructional activities were coded as teacher managed or child managed and as explicit or implicit, as well as for change in amount of time spent in the activity over the school year. Findings revealed that specific patterns of instructional activities differentially predicted children's decoding skill growth. Children with low initial decoding scores achieved greater decoding growth in classrooms with more time spent in teacher-managed explicit decoding (TME) instruction. In contrast, for children with initially high decoding scores, amount of TME had no effect. Children with low initial vocabulary scores achieved greater decoding score growth in classrooms with less child-managed implicit (CMI) instruction but with increasing amounts of CMI instruction as the school year progressed. However, children with high initial vocabulary scores achieved greater decoding growth in classrooms with more time spent in CMI activities and in consistent amounts throughout the school year. Children's initial decoding and vocabulary scores also directly and positively affected their decoding score growth. These main effects and interactions were independent and additive, thus children's first-grade decoding skill growth was affected by initial vocabulary and decoding skill as well as type of instruction received-but the effect of type of instruction (TME or CMI amount and change) depended on children's initial vocabulary and decoding scores. Implications for research and educational practices are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-336
Number of pages32
JournalScientific Studies of Reading
Volume8
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reading
instruction
Vocabulary
Growth
interaction
vocabulary
classroom
teacher
Warfare
school
research practice
educational practice
Language
literacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Education

Cite this

Beyond the reading wars : Exploring the effect of child-instruction interactions on growth in early reading. / Connor, Carol McDonald; Morrison, Frederick J.; Katch, Leslie E.

In: Scientific Studies of Reading, Vol. 8, No. 4, 2004, p. 305-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Connor, Carol McDonald ; Morrison, Frederick J. ; Katch, Leslie E. / Beyond the reading wars : Exploring the effect of child-instruction interactions on growth in early reading. In: Scientific Studies of Reading. 2004 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 305-336.
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