Beyond the final report

A research note on the Assessing Police Use of Force Policy and Outcomes project

William Terrill, Eugene A. Paoline, Jason Robert Ingram

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a snapshot of key findings from research published from the Assessing Police Use of Force Policy and Outcomes study, a project funded by the National Institute of Justice. Design/methodology/approach: Key findings from a national survey of police agencies on use of force policy and from an in-depth look at police use of force outcomes across eight cities published over the last ten years are synthesized to provide a cumulative perspective regarding the outcomes of the project. Findings: The majority of police departments had a written force policy and reporting requirements, however, there was no commonly accepted force policy. Patrol officers were conservative in their views of what is reasonable force, administrative policy does matter in influencing force usage, and the use of a TASER impacted the likelihood of injury for both officers and citizens. Additional findings were also reviewed in the areas of complaints, police culture, first-line supervision, college education, and promotional aspirations. Originality/value: While federal funding for policing related research projects are commonplace, taking a look back ten years later and summarizing key findings is uncommon. Doing so provides concise feedback to practitioners in one readily digestible manuscript. Furthermore, the paper also demonstrates the additional value to the original investment made by the National Institute of Justice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)194-201
Number of pages8
JournalPolicing
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Police
police
Research
Social Justice
justice
administrative policy
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complaint
supervision
Values
research project
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Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
citizen
Education
Wounds and Injuries
methodology
education

Keywords

  • Administrative policy
  • Complaints
  • First-line supervision
  • Force behaviour
  • Police culture
  • Use of force

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

Beyond the final report : A research note on the Assessing Police Use of Force Policy and Outcomes project. / Terrill, William; Paoline, Eugene A.; Ingram, Jason Robert.

In: Policing, Vol. 41, No. 2, 01.01.2018, p. 194-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Terrill, William ; Paoline, Eugene A. ; Ingram, Jason Robert. / Beyond the final report : A research note on the Assessing Police Use of Force Policy and Outcomes project. In: Policing. 2018 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 194-201.
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