Belief, evidence, and interactional meaning in Urama

Jason Brown, Tyler Peterson, Kimberley Craig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In Urama, there are two clause-final particles, ka and ra, that encode a variety of both semantic and pragmatic meanings. While previous approaches have treated these particles as clause-type markers or evidential morphemes, this paper argues that one of these particles, ka, has another previously undocumented function in conversation: to mark speaker-knowledge and what the speaker assumes the addressee to know. We term these interactional uses of ka and ra. Functionally, the interactional use of ka follows from its clause-typing and speech act properties. Theoretically, Urama represents a language that has a grammatical strategy for tracking information in the Common Ground, which is close in spirit to evidentiality and clause-typing, but qualitatively different.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)432-448
Number of pages17
JournalOceanic Linguistics
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

speech act
pragmatics
conversation
semantics
language
evidence
Interaction
Particle
Clause

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Belief, evidence, and interactional meaning in Urama. / Brown, Jason; Peterson, Tyler; Craig, Kimberley.

In: Oceanic Linguistics, Vol. 55, No. 2, 01.12.2016, p. 432-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Jason ; Peterson, Tyler ; Craig, Kimberley. / Belief, evidence, and interactional meaning in Urama. In: Oceanic Linguistics. 2016 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 432-448.
@article{def429a2d7764fe29c46161a8362804d,
title = "Belief, evidence, and interactional meaning in Urama",
abstract = "In Urama, there are two clause-final particles, ka and ra, that encode a variety of both semantic and pragmatic meanings. While previous approaches have treated these particles as clause-type markers or evidential morphemes, this paper argues that one of these particles, ka, has another previously undocumented function in conversation: to mark speaker-knowledge and what the speaker assumes the addressee to know. We term these interactional uses of ka and ra. Functionally, the interactional use of ka follows from its clause-typing and speech act properties. Theoretically, Urama represents a language that has a grammatical strategy for tracking information in the Common Ground, which is close in spirit to evidentiality and clause-typing, but qualitatively different.",
author = "Jason Brown and Tyler Peterson and Kimberley Craig",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1353/ol.2016.0020",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "55",
pages = "432--448",
journal = "Oceanic Linguistics",
issn = "0029-8115",
publisher = "University of Hawaii Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Belief, evidence, and interactional meaning in Urama

AU - Brown, Jason

AU - Peterson, Tyler

AU - Craig, Kimberley

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - In Urama, there are two clause-final particles, ka and ra, that encode a variety of both semantic and pragmatic meanings. While previous approaches have treated these particles as clause-type markers or evidential morphemes, this paper argues that one of these particles, ka, has another previously undocumented function in conversation: to mark speaker-knowledge and what the speaker assumes the addressee to know. We term these interactional uses of ka and ra. Functionally, the interactional use of ka follows from its clause-typing and speech act properties. Theoretically, Urama represents a language that has a grammatical strategy for tracking information in the Common Ground, which is close in spirit to evidentiality and clause-typing, but qualitatively different.

AB - In Urama, there are two clause-final particles, ka and ra, that encode a variety of both semantic and pragmatic meanings. While previous approaches have treated these particles as clause-type markers or evidential morphemes, this paper argues that one of these particles, ka, has another previously undocumented function in conversation: to mark speaker-knowledge and what the speaker assumes the addressee to know. We term these interactional uses of ka and ra. Functionally, the interactional use of ka follows from its clause-typing and speech act properties. Theoretically, Urama represents a language that has a grammatical strategy for tracking information in the Common Ground, which is close in spirit to evidentiality and clause-typing, but qualitatively different.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85005995932&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85005995932&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1353/ol.2016.0020

DO - 10.1353/ol.2016.0020

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85005995932

VL - 55

SP - 432

EP - 448

JO - Oceanic Linguistics

JF - Oceanic Linguistics

SN - 0029-8115

IS - 2

ER -