Behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of striatal dopamine depletion: A rodent model of Parkinson's disease

Emily K. Plowman, Jeffrey Kleim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Both limb and cranial motor functions are adversely impacted by Parkinson's disease (PD). While current pharmacological and surgical interventions are effective in alleviating general limb motor symptoms of PD, they have failed to provide significant benefit for cranial motor functions. This suggests that the neuropathologies mediating limb and cranial motor impairments in PD may differ. Animal models provide a mechanism by which the potential neural dysfunctions underlying these different motor impairments may be characterized. Central goals to our laboratory have been to (a) determine the differential responses of cranial motor and limb motor function to striatal dopamine depletion and (b) determine the differential effects of striatal dopamine depletion on the integrity of cranial motor and limb motor neural circuits. This paper details the use of a comprehensive battery of limb and cranial motor behavioral tasks and the application of intracortical microstimulation to assess corticospinal and corticobulbar circuits in a rodent model of PD. Our work suggests that striatal dopamine depletion does differentially affect cranial and limb motor function and corticospinal and corticobulbar circuits. Further, we propose that cranial motor impairments in PD may be mediated by pathology both within and outside nigrostriatal dopamine system.Learning outcomes: Readers will be able to (a) describe a set of motor tests used to assess limb motor and cranial motor function in an animal model of Parkinson's disease, (b) understand the application of intracortical microstimulation to assess corticospinal and corticobulbar circuits, (c) describe the differential effects of dopamine depletion on limb motor and cranial motor function in a rodent model of PD, and (d) understand the potential role of dysfunction outside the nigrostriatal system mediating cranial motor impairments in Parkinson's disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)549-556
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Communication Disorders
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

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Keywords

  • Corticobulbar
  • Corticospinal
  • Cranial motor
  • Intracortical microstimulation
  • Limb motor
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Rodent
  • Translational

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • LPN and LVN
  • Speech and Hearing

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