Behavioral and Educational Interventions to Support Family Caregivers in End-of-Life Care: A Systematic Review

Nai Ching Chi, George Demiris, Frances M. Lewis, Amy J. Walker, Shelby Langer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The demand for family caregivers steadily increases as the number of people receiving hospice and palliative care rises. Family caregivers play a significant role in supporting their loved ones in end-of-life care. However, there is limited evidence about the effectiveness of the interventions for supporting family caregivers. This article synthesizes behavioral and educational interventions that support family caregivers in end-of-life care. A systematic review was conducted and searched interventional studies published between 2004 and 2014 in PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, and The Cochrane Library electronic databases. Fourteen studies were identified and analyzed: 4 educational studies, 6 cognitive behavioral therapy studies, and 4 psychoeducational studies. All educational and behavioral interventions had developed structures and treatment manuals and improved family caregivers’ outcomes. The cognitive behavioral therapy resulted in more positive outcomes than the other 2 interventions. More rigorous randomized controlled trials are needed to replicate current effective interventions with larger and diverse sample. Future studies need to develop tools for assessing family caregivers’ needs, create consistent and specific tools to effectively measure family caregivers’ outcomes, incorporate a cost-effectiveness analysis, and find the most efficient intervention format and method.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)894-908
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
Volume33
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Terminal Care
Caregivers
Cognitive Therapy
Hospice Care
Palliative Care
PubMed
Libraries
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Databases

Keywords

  • behavior therapy
  • cognitive behavioral therapy
  • cognitive psychotherapy
  • education
  • end-of-life care
  • family caregiver
  • hospice care
  • palliative care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Behavioral and Educational Interventions to Support Family Caregivers in End-of-Life Care : A Systematic Review. / Chi, Nai Ching; Demiris, George; Lewis, Frances M.; Walker, Amy J.; Langer, Shelby.

In: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 9, 01.11.2016, p. 894-908.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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