Behavior and exocrine glands in the myrmecophilous beetle Dinarda dentata (Gravenhorst, 1806) (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Aleocharinae)

Berthold Hoelldobler, Christina L. Kwapich

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The nests of advanced eusocial ant species can be considered ecological islands with a diversity of ecological niches inhabited by not only the ants and their brood, but also a multitude of other organisms adapted to particular niches. In the current paper, we describe the myrmecophilous behavior and the exocrine glands that enable the staphylinid beetle Dinarda dentata to live closely with its host ants Formica sanguinea. We confirm previous anecdotal descriptions of the beetle’s ability to snatch regurgitated food from ants that arrive with a full crop in the peripheral nest chambers, and describe how the beetle is able to appease its host ants and dull initial aggression in the ants.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article numbere0210524
    JournalPloS one
    Volume14
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

    Fingerprint

    Exocrine Glands
    exocrine glands
    Ants
    Staphylinidae
    Beetles
    Crops
    Formicidae
    Coleoptera
    niches
    nests
    Formica
    Aptitude
    Aggression
    Islands
    aggression
    Food
    organisms
    crops

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
    • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

    Cite this

    Behavior and exocrine glands in the myrmecophilous beetle Dinarda dentata (Gravenhorst, 1806) (Coleoptera : Staphylinidae: Aleocharinae). / Hoelldobler, Berthold; Kwapich, Christina L.

    In: PloS one, Vol. 14, No. 1, e0210524, 01.01.2019.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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