". . .be a genuine homemaker in your own home": Gender and familial relations in state housing practices, 1917-1922

Paul C. Luken, Suzanne Vaughan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 12 Citations

Abstract

Using institutional ethnography we examine the Own-Your-Own-Home (OYOH) movement as a configuration of ideological practices designed to reorder gender, family and housing arrangements in the United States during the early 20th century. We describe the social organization of these practices - with particular emphasis on the coordinating activity of the OYOH Section of the Department of Labor -and provide specific examples from texts of the National Archives and Research Administration. These texts are part of an historic, ongoing process of work organization that coordinated other sequences of action at multiple sites of production within the housing enterprise. We demonstrate that the texts of the campaign organized white, working class, married couples with children as the owners of homes.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1603-1626
Number of pages24
JournalSocial Forces
Volume83
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jun 2005

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housing
housing enterprise
gender
work organization
married couple
working class
ethnography
campaign
labor
organization
Familial
National Archives
Enterprise
Historic
Social Organization
Institutional Ethnography
Arrangement
Labor
Working Class

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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". . .be a genuine homemaker in your own home" : Gender and familial relations in state housing practices, 1917-1922. / Luken, Paul C.; Vaughan, Suzanne.

In: Social Forces, Vol. 83, No. 4, 06.2005, p. 1603-1626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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