Basketball teams as strategic networks.

Jennifer Fewell, Hans Armbruster, John Ingraham, Alexander Petersen, James S. Waters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We asked how team dynamics can be captured in relation to function by considering games in the first round of the NBA 2010 play-offs as networks. Defining players as nodes and ball movements as links, we analyzed the network properties of degree centrality, clustering, entropy and flow centrality across teams and positions, to characterize the game from a network perspective and to determine whether we can assess differences in team offensive strategy by their network properties. The compiled network structure across teams reflected a fundamental attribute of basketball strategy. They primarily showed a centralized ball distribution pattern with the point guard in a leadership role. However, individual play-off teams showed variation in their relative involvement of other players/positions in ball distribution, reflected quantitatively by differences in clustering and degree centrality. We also characterized two potential alternate offensive strategies by associated variation in network structure: (1) whether teams consistently moved the ball towards their shooting specialists, measured as "uphill/downhill" flux, and (2) whether they distributed the ball in a way that reduced predictability, measured as team entropy. These network metrics quantified different aspects of team strategy, with no single metric wholly predictive of success. However, in the context of the 2010 play-offs, the values of clustering (connectedness across players) and network entropy (unpredictability of ball movement) had the most consistent association with team advancement. Our analyses demonstrate the utility of network approaches in quantifying team strategy and show that testable hypotheses can be evaluated using this approach. These analyses also highlight the richness of basketball networks as a dataset for exploring the relationships between network structure and dynamics with team organization and effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere47445
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number11
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Basketball
Entropy
Cluster Analysis
entropy
Fluxes
leadership

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Fewell, J., Armbruster, H., Ingraham, J., Petersen, A., & Waters, J. S. (2012). Basketball teams as strategic networks. PLoS One, 7(11), [e47445].

Basketball teams as strategic networks. / Fewell, Jennifer; Armbruster, Hans; Ingraham, John; Petersen, Alexander; Waters, James S.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 11, e47445, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fewell, J, Armbruster, H, Ingraham, J, Petersen, A & Waters, JS 2012, 'Basketball teams as strategic networks.', PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 11, e47445.
Fewell J, Armbruster H, Ingraham J, Petersen A, Waters JS. Basketball teams as strategic networks. PLoS One. 2012;7(11). e47445.
Fewell, Jennifer ; Armbruster, Hans ; Ingraham, John ; Petersen, Alexander ; Waters, James S. / Basketball teams as strategic networks. In: PLoS One. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 11.
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