Baroque disruptions in val di noto, sicily

Thomas J. Puleo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two earthquakes that struck Sicily nearly three centuries apart provide the basis for an interpretation of subsequent events. After the 1693 earthquake, local inhabitants rebuilt their towns in a version of baroque architecture that is unique to the region. After the 1990 quake, their descendants mounted a campaign to restore the crumbling landscapes and then, years later, to unite in opposition against an oil company that threatened the newly restored sites. Michel Serres's theory of the "parasite" informs a reading of the earthquakes and the events that followed them as agents that disrupted the flow of human-environment relationships and produced hybridized landscapes and political alliances. In this way the Sicilian baroque is both a style of architecture and a mode of social and political mobilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-493
Number of pages18
JournalGeographical Review
Volume100
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

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natural disaster
earthquake
human-environment relationship
political alliance
event
inhabitant
mobilization
parasite
opposition
campaign
town
interpretation
oil

Keywords

  • Architecture
  • Baroque
  • Earthquake
  • Politics
  • Sicily

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

Baroque disruptions in val di noto, sicily. / Puleo, Thomas J.

In: Geographical Review, Vol. 100, No. 4, 10.2010, p. 476-493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Puleo, Thomas J. / Baroque disruptions in val di noto, sicily. In: Geographical Review. 2010 ; Vol. 100, No. 4. pp. 476-493.
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