Bargaining theory and cooperative fishing participation on Ifaluk Atoll

Richard Sosis, Sharon Feldstein, Kim Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper we examine the merit of bargaining theory, in its economic and ecological forms, as a model for understanding variation in the frequency of participation in cooperative fishing among men of Ifaluk atoll in Micronesia. Two determinants of bargaining power are considered: resource control and a bargainer's utility gain for his expected share of the negotiated resource. Several hypotheses which relate cultural and life-course parameters to bargaining power are tested against data on the frequency of cooperative sail-fishing participation. Consistent with predictions generated from bargaining theory, we show that (1) age is negatively correlated with cooperative fishing participation, (2) men of high-ranking clans and men with high levels of education fish less than men of low-ranking clans and less-educated men, (3) men with high expected utility gains from fishing returns fish more than men with low expected utility gains, (4) number of dependents is positively correlated with cooperative fishing participation, and (5) the number of young genetic offspring residing with a man is positively correlated with cooperative fishing participation, whereas the number of genetic offspring more than 13 years old who are residing with a man is negatively correlated with cooperative fishing participation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-203
Number of pages41
JournalHuman Nature
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bargaining theory
  • Collective action
  • Cooperative fishing
  • Micronesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Bargaining theory and cooperative fishing participation on Ifaluk Atoll'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this