Bacteriophage associated silicon particles: Design and characterization of a novel theranostic vector with improved payload carrying potential

Srimeenakshi Srinivasan, Jenolyn F. Alexander, Wouter H. Driessen, Fransisca Leonard, Ye Hu, Xuewu Liu, Wadih Arap, Renata Pasqualini, Mauro Ferrari, Biana Godin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There has been extensive research on the use of nanovectors for cancer therapy. Targeted delivery of nanotherapeutics necessitates two important characteristics: the ability to accumulate at the disease locus after overcoming sequential biological barriers and the ability to carry a substantial therapeutic payload. Successful combination of the above two features is challenging, especially in solid porous materials where chemical conjugation of targeting entities on the particle surface will generally prevent successful loading of the therapeutic substance. In this study, we propose a novel strategy for decorating the surface of mesoporous silicon particles with targeting entities (bacteriophage) and gold nanoparticles (AuNP) while maintaining their payload carrying potential. The resulting Bacteriophage Associated Silicon Particles (BASP) demonstrate efficient encapsulation of macromolecules and therapeutic nanoparticles into the porous structures. In vitro targeting data show enhanced targeting efficiency with about four orders of magnitude lower concentration of bacteriophage. In vivo targeting data suggest that BASP maintain their integrity following intravenous administration in mice and display up to three fold higher accumulation in the tumor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5218-5229
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Materials Chemistry B
Volume1
Issue number39
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 21 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bacteriophages
Silicon
Nanoparticles
Therapeutics
Macromolecules
Encapsulation
Gold
Intravenous Administration
Porous materials
Tumors
Neoplasms
Theranostic Nanomedicine
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Bacteriophage associated silicon particles : Design and characterization of a novel theranostic vector with improved payload carrying potential. / Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Alexander, Jenolyn F.; Driessen, Wouter H.; Leonard, Fransisca; Hu, Ye; Liu, Xuewu; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata; Ferrari, Mauro; Godin, Biana.

In: Journal of Materials Chemistry B, Vol. 1, No. 39, 21.10.2013, p. 5218-5229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Srinivasan, S, Alexander, JF, Driessen, WH, Leonard, F, Hu, Y, Liu, X, Arap, W, Pasqualini, R, Ferrari, M & Godin, B 2013, 'Bacteriophage associated silicon particles: Design and characterization of a novel theranostic vector with improved payload carrying potential' Journal of Materials Chemistry B, vol. 1, no. 39, pp. 5218-5229. https://doi.org/10.1039/c3tb20595a
Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi ; Alexander, Jenolyn F. ; Driessen, Wouter H. ; Leonard, Fransisca ; Hu, Ye ; Liu, Xuewu ; Arap, Wadih ; Pasqualini, Renata ; Ferrari, Mauro ; Godin, Biana. / Bacteriophage associated silicon particles : Design and characterization of a novel theranostic vector with improved payload carrying potential. In: Journal of Materials Chemistry B. 2013 ; Vol. 1, No. 39. pp. 5218-5229.
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