Bachelor of applied science: An innovative degree program

Dale Palmgren, Scott Danielson

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    The Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree often is considered a terminal degree, used to gain access to the workforce. There are a number of technical A.A.S. degrees leading to employment in the broader engineering community. Many individuals who originally gained entrance into the engineering workforce via these degrees have successful careers - up to a point In the authors' experience, significant numbers of people face the requirement of additional degree qualifications before advancement in job responsibilities or career change can occur. Unfortunately, the poor transferability of the A.A.S. degree coursework into Bachelor of Science engineering or engineering technology programs greatly inhibits people from pursuing a new degree. This paper provides details of Arizona State University's successful Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.) program and how it serves this special portion of the engineering workforce. Only a few years old, the B.A.S.'s engineering-related concentrations have already produced satisfied and successful graduates. The majority of the coursework is technical and is drawn from existing ABET-accredited engineering technology programs.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE
    Volume3
    StatePublished - 2004
    Event34th Annual Frontiers in Education: Expanding Educational Opportunities Through Partnerships and Distance Learning - Conference Proceedings, FIE - Savannah, GA, United States
    Duration: Oct 20 2004Oct 23 2004

    Other

    Other34th Annual Frontiers in Education: Expanding Educational Opportunities Through Partnerships and Distance Learning - Conference Proceedings, FIE
    CountryUnited States
    CitySavannah, GA
    Period10/20/0410/23/04

    Fingerprint

    Engineering technology

    Keywords

    • Associate of Applied Science
    • Bachelor of Applied Science

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Palmgren, D., & Danielson, S. (2004). Bachelor of applied science: An innovative degree program. In Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE (Vol. 3)

    Bachelor of applied science : An innovative degree program. / Palmgren, Dale; Danielson, Scott.

    Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. Vol. 3 2004.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Palmgren, D & Danielson, S 2004, Bachelor of applied science: An innovative degree program. in Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. vol. 3, 34th Annual Frontiers in Education: Expanding Educational Opportunities Through Partnerships and Distance Learning - Conference Proceedings, FIE, Savannah, GA, United States, 10/20/04.
    Palmgren D, Danielson S. Bachelor of applied science: An innovative degree program. In Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. Vol. 3. 2004
    Palmgren, Dale ; Danielson, Scott. / Bachelor of applied science : An innovative degree program. Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. Vol. 3 2004.
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