Abstract

Urban sustainability assessment should integrate urban metabolism and life-cycle impact assessment to develop an integrated multi-scale framework for evaluating resource depletion and damages to human health and environmental quality. A streamlined framework can be developed by employing emerging neighborhood-scale data, improving resource depletion and damage to human health and environmental quality characterizations, including socio-demographic characteristics, and integrating methods for making decisions with uncertainty. Foundational elements and an analytical path exist to integrate urban metabolism and life-cycle impact assessment in a streamlined manner. Urban sustainability practitioners must eventually develop new methods for integrating social, institutional, and cultural forces instead of focusing on physical systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)451-457
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Environmental Sustainability
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

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resource depletion
environmental quality
life cycle
metabolism
sustainability
damage
damages
decision making
health
resources
uncertainty
impact assessment
method
human health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Avoiding unintended tradeoffs by integrating life-cycle impact assessment with urban metabolism. / Chester, Mikhail; Pincetl, Stephanie; Allenby, Braden.

In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Vol. 4, No. 4, 10.2012, p. 451-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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