Automated writing instruction and feedback: Instructional mode, attitudes, and revising

Rod D. Roscoe, Laura K. Allen, Adam C. Johnson, Danielle S. McNamara

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study evaluates high school students' perceptions of automated writing feedback, and the influence of these perceptions on revising, as a function of varying modes of computer-based writing instruction. Findings indicate that students' perceptions of automated feedback accuracy, ease of use, relevance, and understandability were favorable. Immediate perceptions of feedback received on a selected essay were minimally related to how and whether students revised their essays. However, attitudes formed over multiple sessions were significantly related to revising. More importantly, the mode of instruction appeared to influence how feedback perceptions shaped revising behaviors. Students who engaged in traditional writingbased training and practice seemed to focus on their own perceived writing abilities when deciding how to revise. In contrast, students who also received strategy instruction and game-based practice attended more carefully to the perceived quality of the automated feedback.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages2089-2093
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781510889538
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Event62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018 - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: Oct 1 2018Oct 5 2018

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume3
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period10/1/1810/5/18

Keywords

  • Automated writing evaluation
  • User experience
  • User perceptions
  • Writing instruction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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    Roscoe, R. D., Allen, L. K., Johnson, A. C., & McNamara, D. S. (2018). Automated writing instruction and feedback: Instructional mode, attitudes, and revising. In 62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018 (pp. 2089-2093). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 3). Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc..