Automated three-dimensional dendrite tracking system

C. F. Garvey, J. H. Young, Paul Coleman, W. Simon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A technique has been developed which automates the measurement of dendritic fields. A microscope fitted with stepping motor drives for all three dimensions is interfaced to a computer by means of a slightly modified vidicon television camera. A set of algorithms has been developed which allows a computer to recognize a dendrite, to follow it to the edge of the field, or until it is no longer in focus, and then move the slide in whatever direction is necessary to continue following that dendrite until it ends. The ability to move the slide, to a considerable degree, circumvents difficulties due to limited camera resolution often described by other workers in this field. The problem of remaining on the correct cell process in spite of cross-over appears to have been satisfactorily solved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-204
Number of pages6
JournalElectroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1973
Externally publishedYes

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Dendrites
Television
Health Personnel
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Automated three-dimensional dendrite tracking system. / Garvey, C. F.; Young, J. H.; Coleman, Paul; Simon, W.

In: Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 35, No. 2, 01.01.1973, p. 199-204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garvey, C. F. ; Young, J. H. ; Coleman, Paul ; Simon, W. / Automated three-dimensional dendrite tracking system. In: Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology. 1973 ; Vol. 35, No. 2. pp. 199-204.
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